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Full text of "Catalogue of an exhibition of illuminated and painted manuscripts, together with a few early printed books with illuminations--also some examples of Persian manuscripts--with plates in facsimile and an introductory essay"

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THE LIBRARY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

Lib r a r y Sahiaol JAhrnry 

GIFT OF 

Estate Of 

Jean Howard McDuffie 

o..... OF CALIFORNIA 

WITHDRAWN 



University of California • Berkeley 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2007 with funding from 

IVIicrosoft Corporation 



http://www.archive.org/details/catalogilluminatOOgrolrich 




The Publication Committee of the GrolierClub 

certify that this copy is one of an edition of three 

hundred and fifty copies on Holland paper, all of 

which were printed from type in the month of 

April, 1892. 



CATALOGUE 

OF AN EXHIBITION 
OF PAINTED MANU 
SCRIPTS AND BOOKS 




FROM THE HOURS OF THE VIRGIN 

No. 35 




^^TALOGUE OF AN EX 
l\ HIBITION OF ILLU 



MINATED AND PAINT 
ED MANUSCRIPTS TO 
GETHER WITH A FEW 
EARLY PRINTED BOOKS WITH ILLU 
MINATIONS— ALSO SOME EXAMPLES 
OF PERSIAN MANUSCRIPTS— WITH 
PLATES IN FACSIMILE AND AN IN 
TRODUCTORY ESSAY 




THE CALLIGRAPHER AND THE PRESENTATION 
OF A BOOK &^v MINIATURES FROM A MANU 
SCRIPT IN THE BIBLIOTHfegUE DE CAMBRAY 



NEW- YORK THE GROLIER CLUB 1892 



Copyright, 1892, by 
The Grolier Club 



Add'l 



TT< 




INTRODUCTION 

HIS is the second attempt of 
the Grolier Club toward 
an exhibition of painted 
manuscripts. The first was made 
shortly after its foundation, about 
eight years ago, when the ma- 
terial available for the purpose 
was much less than at present. 
Beautiful as some of the specimens now shown may 
be, the collection as a whole presents no adequate ex- 
emplification of the art of book-making previous to the 
invention of printing, or to the final triumph of this art 
over that of the calligrapher, the illuminator, and the 
miniaturist. Such an exhibition would be impossible 
in this country. None of the examples in our catalogue 
date further back than the commencement of the thir- 
teenth century. It was, however, after this period that 
the most artistic and fascinating volumes, enriched with 
miniatures, were produced. The majority of those ante- 
rior to that time are more interesting from an archae- 
ological and literary point of view. 

vii 



391 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

Egyptian writings upon papyrus rolls have little in 
common with the modern book made of separate leaves 
bound together. Papyrus was, however, employed to 
some extent in volumes made in the early centuries of 
the Christian era; but the majority of the manuscript 
books of which we have positive knowledge are written 
upon vellum. This proving the least perishable and 
the most satisfactory, papyrus ceased to be used to any 
great extent in Europe after the sixth century, while 
examples of earlier date are excessively rare. 

There are preserved in some of the older libraries 
richly ornamented leaves and fragments of vellum books 
thought to date from the third century of the Christian 
era, and with these properly commences the history of 
the modern book. 

The earliest existing manuscripts of importance are 
now in the Vatican library at Rome, in the Imperial 
Library at Vienna, and in the National Library at Paris. 
They are copies of Virgil, of Terence, and of portions of 
the Bible. Experts differ as to the exact time of their 
production : some place the execution of one of the 
copies of Virgil in the Vatican as early as the fourth 
century, others have thought it to date from the preced- 
ing century; but there seems little doubt that it was 
written in the latter part of the fourth or commencement 
of the fifth century. These volumes, like the parts of the 
Bible in the Vienna library, and the Roman Calendar 

viii 



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FROM THE Xm CENTURY BIBLE 
No. 2 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

(also in Rome), have painted miniatures, and in com- 
mon with many others are not only transcriptions but 
probably copies from still older originals. 

The majority of the earliest manuscripts are artistically 
Greek, and mostly written in the Greek and Latin lan- 
guages. The Byzantine Empire created a type of art of 
its own — a religious art, having its source in the Roman 
decadence, and influenced by the Greek and the semi- 
barbaric styles of the Orient. The earlier books, there- 
fore, may be generally classed artistically as either Greek, 
Latin, or Byzantine. 

It is a popular idea, owing probably to the fact that 
during the middle ages most of the learning was con- 
centrated in the monasteries and religious houses, that 
all the manuscripts were made by the monks. This is 
not true. Although no doubt many were produced by 
them, a large proportion was the work of professional 
scribes, illuminators, and miniaturists. They formed, 
during the centuries preceding the discovery of print- 
ing from movable types, and even for one hundred years 
after that time, a vast army of workers, under the pro- 
tection of kings, princes, and prelates, by whom they 
were encouraged, restricted, or granted special privi- 
leges as whim or necessity determined. 

To the scribe, the illuminator, the miniaturist, and their 
patrons we owe not only the preservation of literature, 
but it is they who bridged over for us the great gulf 
2 ix 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

dividing the arts and literature of Greece and Rome 
from those of modern Europe, making a Renaissance pos- 
sible. Eventually the art of printing from movable type 
annihilated these laborious benefactors, who during a 
century after its discovery (about the year 1440) worked 
on in emulation of the printer, vying with him in the pro- 
duction of beautiful books. He in turn employed the 
illuminator to add additional luster to his work. The 
struggle was an unequal one, and the beginning of the 
seventeenth century saw the complete extinction of the 
miniaturist and of the painter of ornaments and initial 
letters. The scribe perpetuated himself in a measure as 
engrosser of deeds, patents, wills, and the like, until at the 
present day he has degenerated into the " typewriter." 

Printing has been styled " the art preservative of all 
arts," but as we turn from the fascinating pages of a 
manuscript to those of the printer, attractive as they 
may be, we see that he has converted the calligrapher 
into a type-founder, the miniaturist into a designer for 
woodcuts and copperplates, and the illuminator into an 
engraver. The text cunningly written upon fine vel- 
lum, the delicate gilded initials, the quaint and fanciful 
borders to the pages, the historiated capital letters, the 
richly painted artistic miriiatures — all these are arts of 
the past which no amount of printing can restore. 

Trade after the sixteenth century eclipsed art, so far 
as books are concerned. 

X 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

Independently therefore of the paramount value of 
manuscripts as preservatives of all literature previous to 
the invention of printing, they possess a fascinating in- 
terest to art students. Unfortunately the bindings of 
gold, silver, and ivory, inset with rare gems, of which 
there are strange traditions, have almost all disappeared, 
victims to a cupidity which has nothing in common with 
either literature or art. 

In order to obtain a clearer insight into the various 
departments of industry and art entering into the pro- 
duction of illuminated and painted manuscripts, they may 
be divided for consideration into four classes : 

First. As to the vellum or parchment. 
Second. The work of the calligrapher or scribe. 
Third. The art of the illuminator. 
Fourth. The miniaturist. 

VELLUM AND PARCHMENT 

iELLUM is the best of all materials used for manu- 
scripts. Judging from examples of printing 
upon it in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, 
it would seem to claim superiority over paper for the 
modern printed book, but those employing it for this pur- 
pose know that it is now unattainable of a quality at all 
approaching in perfection that made either in the middle 
ages or during the Renaissance. \\\t. old vellum is smooth, 

xi 




ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

even, and white, and retains these quaUties indefinitely. 
That in several of the Bibles exhibited, and made about 
the year 1 200, is more delicate, pure, and flexible than any 
paper, old or new, and with any reasonable care it will 
probably remain the same for hundreds of years to come. 

Vellum was made of the skins of animals (mostly sheep 
and goats), prepared with chalk to insure the removal of 
greasy matter, and rubbed down to an uniformly smooth 
surface with pumice or some similar substance. Immense 
quantities were produced all through the middle ages, 
although cotton paper was used in the ninth, and linen . 
paper began to be made in the tenth century. The 
height of luxury in manuscripts was the employment of 
golden letters upon purple-stained vellum. The cele- 
brated "Book of Hours" of the Emperor Charlemagne 
was of this character; although purple vellum was made 
previous to his day, and as early as the fourth or fifth cen- 
tury. Yellow or saffron-colored vellum was also used in 
manuscripts in the fifteenth century. 

A remarkable characteristic of the old vellum is the 
tenacity with which it retains the ink and the colors, 
which together seem to possess the imperishable quali- 
ties peculiar to the vellum alone. Parchment is only a 
coarser or less finished kind of vellum. The true art of 
making either is lost. That now manufactured blackens 
on exposure to the atmosphere, developing brown spots 
resembling stains, so tl^at the possessor of nineteenth- 

xii 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

century books printed upon vellum or parchment will 
transmit them to his successor with these deteriorations. 
Before passing to the work of the calligrapher, manu- 
scripts known as palimpsest should be mentioned. One 
great source of the destruction of the early books was the 
tendency to ignore or consider as worthless that which 
had ceased to interest, and substitute something "newer" — 
a custom prevailing also in our time. It was found that 
the writing upon vellum could be rubbed off, and other 
works transcribed upon the same sheets. The oblitera- 
tion never completely effaced the more ancient charac- 
ters, which in many instances have been deciphered. A 
work of Cicero was thus discovered beneath a religious 
homily. There is an instance of a lapse of nine hundred 
years between the first and the second writing upon the 
same leaves. 

THE WRITING AND THE MATERIALS EMPLOYED BY 
THE CALLIGRAPHER 

[HE art of calligraphy forms in itself a study sus- 
ceptible of extensive research. Mr. Astle, who 
is quoted by Dibdin in his rather rambling dis- 
course upon old manuscripts, wrote an oft-quoted treatise 
upon it, published in a folio volume in 1803. 

The majority of the manuscripts extant are, as before 
stated, written in Greek or Latin, and largely by Greeks 
who migrated into Italy and adjacent countries, carrying 

xiii 




ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

their arts and artistic traditions with them, and trans- 
mitting them to their descendants. The earliest letters 
employed were round, bold capitals, known as Oncial, or 
Uncial. This style of writing prevailed up to the ninth 
century, or even later, when minuscules, or small letters, 
were used — at first sparingly, and soon increasingly, 
until only the titles and headings of subdivisions were 
written in capitals. Cursive writing followed, formed 
by the partial uniting of the letters, developing many 
varieties. The Italian manuscripts were written in Ro- 
man characters, similar in form to those now ordinarily 
employed in printing. 

The Emperor Charlemagne, in the latter part of the 
eighth century, undertook the reformation of the scribes, 
creating a more intelligent interest in books and liter- 
ature, and regulating the copying and reproduction 
of manuscripts by laws. In 789 we find the monas- 
teries enjoined to the preservation of correct texts "in 
order that requests should not be made to God in bad 
language." 

In the centuries immediately following, however, de- 
generation again set in, and it was not until the elev- 
enth that what is known generally as black-letter, or the 
Gothic form, was introduced. Some of the most perfect 
and beautiful of this species of writing may be seen in 
the Bibles of the early part of the thirteenth century now 
exhibited. It does not need the eye of a printer to dis- 

xiv 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

cern its wonderful evenness, nor the perfection of what 
he would call the "justification" of the pages. From an 
artistic point of view this writing has not been surpassed. 
Upon these models the early printers based the forms of 
their type. 

The older calligraphers and copyists are mostly un- 
known. Occasionally signatures of some of them are 
found in volumes, or records have preserved from entire 
oblivion the names of others noted in their generation. 
It might not now be considered in good taste to embalm 
the hand of a clever artist, but about 1470 this was done 
with that of the scribe Dom Jacopo Fiorentino ; the 
brethren "preserving that hand of his, which had been 
so excellently employed, in worthy keeping to his endless 
memory." Those interested in the biography of minia- 
turists, illuminators, and calligraphers are referred to Mr. 
Bradley's dictionary, in three volumes, published in Lon- 
don, 1887- 1889. It is the first approach to any satis- 
factory systematic record of these artists. 

Of the materials used in writing little is positively 
known. The instruments employed by scribes were the 
camel's-hair brush, or its equivalent, fine reeds or vege- 
table fiber, and later, especially after the twelfth century, 
quill pens. The absence of hair-lines in the earlier 
writing indicates the use of a blunter and less elastic 
instrument than the sharpened quill. 

The black ink was probably burned ivory or bone, 

XV 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

ground with great care. The red, employed for headings 
of divisions and rubrication, was cinnabar (red sulphate 
of mercury). The secret of the durability of all pigments 
employed is undoubtedly in their purity, and in patient 
and thorough grinding by hand, as well as in the ma- 
terials mixed with them to insure adherence to the 
vellum. Further particulars of the colors used in manu- 
scripts will be given in connection with the subject of 
miniature painting. 



INITIAL LETTERS AND ORNAMENTS 

JLTHOUGH calligraphy, illuminating, and minia- 
ture painting have been classed as separate 
arts, sometimes two of them, and occasionally 
the whole three, were practised by the same individual. 
This, however, appears to have been rarely the case in 
the more important manuscripts. In some of them there 
is evidently collaboration in the writing. The initial 
letters also are frequently by one hand, the borders by 
another, and the miniatures the work of several artists. 

Up to the ninth century initial letters were compar- 
atively small, but at no period were the books without 
these more or less elaborate embellishments. 

The illuminators were designers who, though creating 
ornaments of exquisite beauty and originality, frequently 
allowed imagination to lead them into curious conceits. 

xvi 




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FROM THE XIIl CENTURY BIBLE 

; No. 3 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

In the tenth century they began to take strange lib- 
erties with the alphabet, constructing initials of ex- 
traordinary proportions, covering in some instances a 
quarter or more of the page. Around them, up and 
down the margins, and across above and below the 
text, weird ramifications of the designs were spread in 
fantastic variety, until imagination exhausted itself in 
creating and the eye in following them. They em- 
brace adaptations of every phase of form suggested by 
animate and inanimate nature; of the natural and the 
unnatural. We find the letters constructed of fishes, 
animals, and birds, twisted into fantastic shapes, or com- 
bined with the human figure. 

Conventional styles of ornament are characteristic of 
the prevailing conceptions of art in the various epochs. 
Very beautiful letters are found in Flemish and French 
manuscripts of the thirteenth century, and they improved 
both in beauty and refinement with the progress of the 
Renaissance. When historiated, or containing miniatures 
within the designs, the effect and interest are enhanced. 

The borders to the pages, introduced more extensively 
after the thirteenth century, are often not only wonder- 
fully elaborate, but one hesitates which to admire most, 
their delicacy, or the brilliancy of the effect of the scroll- 
work and flowers. In exquisite taste and profusion, 
violets, carnations, daisies, strawberries, and green leaves, 
interspersed with small human figures, birds, animals, 
3 xvii 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

and fantastic monstrosities, comically hideous, and height- 
ened with burnished gold, are harmoniously combined. 
It has been suggested that these borders were intended 
originally as typical of the gay attractions of the outer 
world, and the hideous monsters rioting in them its dark 
or retributive side — a mystical warning to the owner of 
the Horae or Missal. 

Gold was universally and very skilfully employed in 
decoration. In the early Byzantine books it formed the 
background for writing and illuminations; the gold evi- 
dently being applied in the leaf and then burnished. 
Sometimes it was upon a raised ground, giving the effect 
of having been embossed. The art of insuring its ad- 
herence to the vellum, so that time and the handling of 
the leaves fail to loosen it, is now somewhat of a mystery. 
It seems to have been applied upon a preparation resem- 
bling chalk or white lead. The gold used in the paint- 
ings was ground extremely fine, and the powder mixed 
with white of eggs or some species of gum to insure its 
adherence to the vellum. Powdered silver was treated in 
the same manner. Gold was also sometimes mingled 
with the colors in miniature painting. 

The best blue was the ultramarine, so called because 
made of the "blue stone" or lapis lazuli from beyond the 
sea. It was laboriously ground, as were the other colors, 
upon hard stone slabs. Indigo (a vegetable production 
made in India) was also used. Cobalt was another min- 

xviii 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

eral from which blue was made, and this is the same 
material with which the "old blue" or nankin china was 
painted. The red was principally cinnabar and red lead, 
or a mixture of both; the yellow, the Eastern ocher; 
umber was employed for the browns ; the white was fine 
white lead, and the green verdigris and terra verde, a 
blue-green ocher. 

The beautiful gray tints used with such fine effect in 
draperies, and especially in the painting known as cam- 
aieu-gris, were made with the white lead mixed with the 
black, obtained, as already explained, by burning wood, 
ivory, or bone. The term "camaieu" is applied gener- 
ally to all paintings in tones or tints of one color. They 
were executed in blue, red, and in gold shaded with a 
mixture of black, as well as in gray. 

Volumes might be written describing the various styles 
of illumination prevailing in the different centuries, and 
their many phases, without compassing the subject. Their 
varieties are infinite, or, like the harmonies or discords in 
music, exhaustless. 

The Byzantine ornamentation was in its barbaric gor- 
geousness more pronounced in style than that of any 
other school, excepting the early Greek, and is easily dis- 
tinguished. The amateur will have little difificulty, after 
having studied the pictorial art of different periods and 
countries, in judging whether illuminations are Greek, 
Byzantine, Italian, Flemish, French, German, English, or 

xix 




ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

Spanish ; or in determining to which particular school 
they stand related. 

Artists were migratory in the middle ages. They 
carried their styles and methods into countries other 
than their own, and combined them with those there 
prevailing. This is as clearly demonstrated in miniature 
painting as in other arts. 



THE MINIATURIST 

)?f^(^.c '^HE crowning charm in the old manuscripts is, 
after all, in their miniatures. They have been 
the means of conveying to us clearer and better 
ideas of the arts, habits, and customs of the middle ages 
up to the time of, and through the best period of the 
Renaissance than any other agency. 

The only paintings surviving from the earliest Chris- 
tian centuries are mosaics (if they may be so classed), 
mural decorations, and a comparatively few small ex- 
amples, on stone or some almost equally imperishable 
material, found in Roman catacombs, and now mostly 
gathered into the Vatican museum. After these the 
manuscript books are the only artistic records. In them 
we may see delineated the gradual supremacy of Chris- 
tianity over paganism. Beginning with the Vatican 
Virgil (containing fifty miniatures), the Terences, and 
other manuscripts already mentioned, although rude in 

XX 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

execution, we find the paintings invested with a certain 
dignity, repose, and simplicity, the result of Greek tra- 
dition and inspiration. All the Italian manuscripts show 
this influence. In early Christian books David may be 
found pictured in the form of Apollo, and the represen- 
tations of the Deity modeled after the types of Jupiter, 
In Byzantine manuscripts the figures of the Evangel- 
ists and Saints frequently have an impressive strength 
little short of grandeur. It was not the custom in the 
earlier centuries to depict the subject of Christ's death 
on the cross. The Christians shrank from its ignominy. 
That, with the image-worship which appeared in later 
painting, was not introduced in manuscripts until the 
seventh century, and only became general later on. 

A partial artistic reformation began in the eleventh 
century, based not upon tradition, but the study of nature, 
aided by a return to the best Greek models. Modern 
realism took the place of the old symbolism, although 
the progress toward this emancipation, or regeneration, 
was slow. The real dawn of the Renaissance was not 
until the thirteenth century, when it appeared almost 
simultaneously in Flanders and Italy with the advent of 
the Van Eycks and Memling in the Low Countries, and 
of Cimabue and Giotto in Italy. The arts, however, 
did not make equal progress in the various countries of 
Europe. For a considerable period Flemish art domi- 
nated that of Germany and France. In the latter entire 

xxi 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

freedom from the old Roman and Byzantine ideas in 
miniature painting was not effected until the fourteenth 
century. The same is true of Spain, while in England 
the art was comparatively little practised, and in an in- 
ferior manner. In fact, English art in manuscripts always 
lacks grace and finish when compared with that of the 
Continent. 

The influence of the Van Eycks, Memling, and Giotto, 
and of the schools they established, represented by Van 
der Weyde, Hans Memling, Fra Angelico, Andrea Man- 
tegna, Botticelli, Perugino, and others whose names are 
familiar to all art-lovers, extended into the sixteenth 
century. Many of these artists painted miniatures in 
books. 

These small pictures are frequently classed as an in- 
ferior department of art, and held in too slight an esti- 
mation, as compared with paintings on a large scale, 
covering greater area. This is a mistake; for to paint 
miniatures well requires a skill and talent equal to that 
demanded for most large pictures. Possibly their com- 
parative inaccessibility, in books, accounts for their beau- 
ties and worth being less familiar, and meeting with 
more tardy recognition than their importance warrants. 

A complete history of pictorial art in civilized Europe 
must embrace that found in manuscripts. Any one de- 
siring proof of this, as well as of the capabilities of minia- 
ture painting, is asked to inspect the Lectionary of Giulio 

xxii 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

Clovio in the Lenox Library. On its pages will be found 
a wealth of conception, coloring, and artistic treatment, 
recalling the age of Michelangelo, Titian, and Raphael, 
of which Clovio was an ornament, and whose name is 
worthy of mention in connection with theirs. 

An advantage possessed by miniatures upon vellum 
is their superior chance of longevity. As already shown, 
there exist painted vellum books about fifteen hundred 
years old, and unless overtaken by violent destruction 
the illuminations and miniatures by Clovio, and those in 
the present exhibition, will retain their freshness and 
beauty long after the pictures by Raphael and Titian 
have crumbled away. 

At the time of Louis IX. of France (in the early part 
of the thirteenth century) some beautiful manuscript 
books were made, and notably among them is the famous 
Psalter of St. Louis, preserved at Paris, and also the 
Roman de Saint- Greal, both containing miniatures re- 
markable for originality of treatment, brilliancy, and 
delicacy. At this period the decorations and paintings 
in the Bibles, missals, and religious books generally, 
are finer than those illustrating profane literature, or in 
the romances of chivalry, which had begun to occupy a 
conspicuous place among the writings of the time. 

In the fourteenth century not only the religious books, 
but the classics, such as Ovid, Horace, Virgil, and Cicero, 
were rewritten with increased richness and splendor of 

xxiii 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

adornment. Words can do very little, however, toward 
portraying the fascinating beauties found in the manu- 
scripts produced in Europe during the fifteenth and six- 
teenth centuries. Kings, nobles, and prelates had attached 
to their courts, and among their retainers, scribes and 
miniaturists, by whom they caused sumptuous volumes 
to be made. Charles V. of France ; his father, Louis of 
Orleans; the Dukes of Burgundy, Philippe le Hardi, 
Philippe le Bon; and the Due de Berri, are among those 
whose passion for books led to the creation of the re- 
markable collections of manuscripts of chivalry, romance, 
chronicles, and devotion, forming the famous Burgundian 
Library, once numbering several thousand volumes, many 
of which are still preserved in Brussels. 

When notable books were completed, whether sacred 
or profane, their presentation was signalized by religious 
ceremony; mass was said in the cathedrals, and pageants 
attended their installation in the library. The Flemish 
and French courts in those times moved from place to 
place in Flanders and France. Brussels was the center 
of a flourishing school of miniaturists, as were Bruges and 
others of the large Flemish cities in the fifteenth century. 
Indeed, Paris was at this period comparatively small. It 
was the Emperor Charles V. of Germany who once twitted 
the ambitious Fran9ois I. in the saying, repeated in Gand 
(or Ghent) to this day, "Je mettrai ton Paris dans mon 
gant." The Emperor was an amateur of books, and in 

xxiv 




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FROM THE HOR/E 
No. 13 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

one of the intervals of his warfare with Frangois sent him 
a present of fine volumes he had caused to be elaborately 
bound at Venice. 

There is in the library of St. Mark's in that city a very 
fine breviary, once belonging to Cardinal Grimani, with 
miniatures of extraordinary beauty, many of them said 
to be by Hans Memling. The Cardinal purchased the 
manuscript of a dealer, and while the association of his 
name with it causes him to be remembered through cen- 
turies, a strange irony of fate leaves that of the maker 
of the book buried in the oblivion of uncertainty. 

Another remarkable manuscript, and perhaps the most 
noteworthy of the fifteenth century, is the "Book of 
Hours" of Anne de Bretagne, wife of Louis XII. of 
France, the work of Touranian artists. This city was the 
center of a school of art of which Jean Foucquet, living 
from about 141 5 to 1485, became the most brilliant figure. 
He went to Rome to study, returning to Tours where 
he practised his art. He and his followers during more 
than a century enriched manuscripts with ornaments and 
miniatures of the choicest description. Unfortunately 
most of them failed to sign their work, so that the author- 
ship even of the superb pages in the "Hours" of Anne de 
Bretagne is a matter of conjecture. Although Foucquet 
has been credited with having painted them, they are 
now considered to be in part the work of an artist named 
Bourdichon, court painter to Louis XI., Charles VIII., 

4 XXV 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

and Louis XII. Examining this manuscript as repro- 
duced through the modern process of chromoHthography, 
although failing as it does to render the vivid brilliancy 
of the original, it would appear that the extreme limits of 
the art had been reached. Even Foucquet, however, as 
seen in his celebrated volume of Josephus, and the Livy 
at Paris, was destined to be excelled by Giulio Clovio, 
who, eclipsing all his predecessors, left no worthy suc- 
cessor. He was born in 1498, and lived until 1578, work- 
ing in Rome and other Italian cities. He had Giulio 
Romano for a friend and adviser, if not as master. Both 
Foucquet and Clovio had many scholars and assistants 
who perpetuated their styles of painting. 

The art of the miniaturist in manuscripts reached a 
high stage of perfection in Florence. Attavante, born 
there in 1455, and living until 1520, executed remarkable 
works. Both he and Geervaest David, record of whom 
is made by Vasari, and who studied at Rome, and lived at 
Bruges, in the latter part of the fifteenth and the begin- 
ning of the sixteenth century, painted books with orna- 
ments and miniatures of great merit. 

The name of another talented artist should be recorded: 
that of Geoffrey Tory, a Frenchman, who combined with 
miniature painting the occupations of designer, engraver, 
author, and printer. With his death, according to Bernard 
in 1533, may be said to virtually close the history of the 
written and painted book. 

xxvi 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

An account of manuscript painters and writers, however 
brief, would probably be considered incomplete without 
some allusion to Nicolas Jarry, a Parisian, born early in 
the seventeenth century. He was a clever calligrapher, 
and pleasing miniatures are sometimes found in volumes 
done by him. His transcription of the celebrated "Guir- 
lande de Julie," a volume composed of verses by various 
admirers of the beautiful Mademoiselle de Rambouillet, 
and ornamented with floral ornaments by the artist Rob- 
ert, has principally served to bring his name and work 
into repute. 

Manuscripts, to be adequately appreciated and enjoyed, 
require careful and patient study. They appeal preemi- 
nently to the refined and cultivated taste. The choicest 
of them are the outcome of religious fervor, which de- 
manded the b^st that artistic inspiration could furnish. 
In the Breviaries, Psalters, Bibles, and above all in the 
Horae, or Books of Hours, are found the majority of the 
choicest miniatures and illuminations. The Horae usually 
commence with a calendar, very frequently adorned with 
paintings appropriate to each month of the year, and the 
signs of the Zodiac. The four Evangelists follow in their 
appointed places ; after them come events in the life 
of Christ, the Passion and Crucifixion; succeeded by 
scenes taken from the Old Testament ; finally concluding 
with representations of the Saints and Martyrs. The 
pictures of the Virgin are usually executed with the 

xxvii 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

utmost skitl of the artists, and kneeling before her is often 
placed the portrait of the person for whom the volume 
was made. 

In a poem by Eustache Dechamps, of the time of 
Charles V. of France, the requirements of a fine lady as 
to her " Book of Hours" are quaintly rhymed: 

" Heures me fault de Notre Dame, 
Si comme il appartient a fame 
Venne de noble paraige, 
Qui sorent de soutil onvraige, 
D'or et d'azur, riches et cointe, 
Bien ordennees et bien pointes, 
De fin drap d'or tres-bien couvertes : 
Et quand elles seront ouverte 
Deux fermaulx d'or qui fermeront." 

(Hours of our Lady should be mine, 
Fitting for a noble dame 
Of lofty lineage and name ; 
Wrot most cunningly and quaint 
In gold and richest azure paint ; 
Rare covering of cloth of gold 
Full daintily it shall enfold ; 
Or open to the view, exposed 
Two golden clasps to keep it closed.) 

The illuminated printed books competed with and suc- 
ceeded the manuscripts. Blank spaces were usually left 
in them at the commencement of chapters or divisions, 
which the illuminator filled with colored capitals more or 

xxviii 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

less ornamented. Borders were also added, and occasion- 
ally whole pages occupied by miniatures, which were also 
interspersed irregularly in the text. Examples of these 
in volumes printed by Schaeffer, Jensen, Aldus, de Spira, 
Hardouin, Simon Vostre, Annabat, and others are in- 
cluded in the present exhibition. They are upon vellum 
and paper. 

A few Persian and Arabic manuscripts are also shown. 
None of them date further back than the sixteenth cen- 
tury. They are not common, and when richly ornamented, 
and containing miniatures, are exceedingly rare. There 
are few fine examples in this country, nor are they 
numerous in European libraries. They are remarkable 
for brilliancy of coloring, neatness, elaboration of design, 
and treatment, and are well worthy of study, presenting 
much that is characteristic and attractive in Persian art. 
They are written upon an extremely tough and imperish- 
able paper, made of vegetable fiber, in characters formed 
with the camel's-hair pencil. 



THE PATRON AND COLLECTOR OF MANUSCRIPTS 

FEW words as to some of the patrons of the 
artists and of noted amateurs and collectors of 
manuscript books at the time of the Renais- 
sance may not be out of place. The Dues de Bourgogne 
have been mentioned in this connection. There are 

xxix 




ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

others who should not be passed unnoticed, for without 
their enlightened encouragement the splendid books of 
the Renaissance could not have existed. 

A name which has become historical, mainly owing to 
its association with art, literature, and books, is that of 
Cardinal d'Amboise. Born in 1460, he became Prime 
Minister to Louis XII. in 1498, and afterward received 
the Cardinal's hat from Julius II. A biographer calls 
him "the Maecenas of France." He aided, perhaps more 
than any of his contemporaries, to revive and stimulate 
in that country the taste for the masterpieces of calli- 
graphy and miniature. In the palatial Chateau- Gaillon, 
built for him, he assembled a superb and costly collection 
of manuscripts, many of which are extant and now en- 
rich the National Library at Paris, comprising what is 
known as the "Amboisian Library." 

Jean le Bon (John II. of France), who became king 
in 1350, will be a familiar name to any one who has 
visited the Paris National Library. He was the first 
of the French monarchs to bequeath books to the na- 
tion, and it is principally in this connection he is now 
remembered. 

In the fifteenth century there existed at Budapest a 
famous library formed by Matthias Corvinus, King of 
Hungary. He employed learned agents to buy books, 
and scribes and miniaturists to create them. A great 
deal has been written about this library, the stormy 

XXX 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

career of its owner, and its fate. Out of many volumes 
(stated by some authorities at 50,000) about 150 only 
are now identified, being mainly in public collections. 
Its dispersion began at Corvinus's death in 1490, and in 
1526 the Turks destroyed the remainder with the thor- 
oughness characteristic of their exploits in this line. As 
vellum books were not found adapted for building fires 
and lighting pipes, they used the printed paper vol- 
umes for this purpose, and simply cut out the miniatures 
from the former, attracted, like children, by their brilliant 
colors. 

In no city in Europe did the arts meet with more en- 
thusiastic encouragement and support than in Florence 
during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries ; and no fam- 
ily ever contributed more toward fostering the taste for 
literature than that of the Florentine Medici. Cosmo 
de Medici, his grandson Lorenzo the Magnificent, and 
Leo X. the son of the latter, surrounded themselves with 
clever literary men and artists, and filled their palaces 
with treasures of ancient art which served as models in 
the decoration of the superb manuscripts of the time. 
The Laurentian Library was founded by them, and con- 
tains a large proportion of the literary collections of the 
Medici family. 

Fran9ois I., King of France (1494-1567) was a liberal 
patron of the miniaturist and scribe. His relations with 
Italy were principally of a warlike nature, but the most 

xxxi 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

valuable of his conquests in that country were the Italian 
artists he induced to come to Paris, and who served to 
further the growth of the French Renaissance. In the 
French National Library are about fifty-five manuscripts 
executed by the king's orders. 

Jean Grolier was king's counselor, and one of the trea- 
surers of France, under Francois I. In a bibliograph- 
ical record of 349 books now existing, which formed part 
of his library, we find eight manuscripts upon vellum. 

It is an interesting fact that these patrons and col- 
lectors of literary treasures lived in turbulent times, and 
all were active and aggressive men, engaged in public 
affairs, dissensions and war. It will be also observed 
that the collection and preservation of manuscripts was 
the work of individuals, and not of governments, com- 
munities, or states, which, as a rule, only provided de- 
positories for what an enlightened taste and patronage 
created and gathered. 

There are few objects more attractive, and none more 
satisfactory, than a beautiful book ; but when to artistic 
beauty there is allied the flavor of antiquity, even if this 
be no greater than four or five hundred years, the charm 
is irresistible. The accounts in history of the destruction 
of books form the most painful pages of the records of 
the past. We know that men must die, but we like their 
good works to live. In the present age, when vandalism 
is regarded in the light of a crime, safeguards environ 

xxxii 









FROM THE LIVRE d'hEURES 
No. 38 



ILLUMINATED AND PAINTED MANUSCRIPTS 

libraries and depositories of art, and the plea of military 
necessity is not considered an excuse for such destruc- 
tion as overtook the ancient library at Alexandria in 
the year 47 b. c, when 700,000 manuscripts are said to 
have been destroyed. Christians do not now, as did the 
Emperor Leon in the year 703, seek to destroy books 
in order to eradicate what they consider recorded errors. 
Determined to abolish the worship of images (a vexed 
subject in early ages), this Emperor Leon deliberately set 
fire to the library of Constantinople, containing 36,000 
manuscripts, and the twelve custodians and professors 
perished with them rather than forsake their books, or 
yield to their mutilation. 

The number of fine manuscripts in existence in Europe 
is still large, although very small in this country. That 
many more will be brought here is probable, although 
the most noted that have survived to the present cen- 
tury are apparently permanently placed in the great Euro- 
pean libraries and museums. 

Keats before his death said: "I have truly loved the 
spirit of beauty in all things." It is this spirit leads us to 
value and preserve these fine old books. Art appeals to 
cultivated tastes in many other forms, but never with 
a greater charm than in these records of the past, the 
work of the scribe, the illuminator, and the miniaturist. 



xxxni 



CATALOGUE. 

EUROPEAN MANUSCRIPTS. 



I PSALTERIUM. Manuscript Ox\ Vellum. 4°. XIII 
Century. 

English manuscript, containing sixteen small miniatures in 
medallions, and nine large historiated initial letters with raised 
backgrounds of burnished gold. 

Bound by Riviere, in red morocco gilt, and inlaid with black 
morocco. 

Size, Sf X 8 inches. 



2 BIBLIA SACRA. Manuscript on Vellum. Small 
Folio. XIII Century. 

This volume is very beautifully written (two columns to each 
page) on the purest and finest of vellum, and probably shortly 
after the year 1200. It contains the whole of the Old and New 
Testaments in Latin, after the text of Saint Jerome. There are 
seventy-six small miniatures in the initial letters, with figures 
in French costumes of the time painted in gold and colors. 

I 



CATALOGUE 

At the end is a dictionary of Hebrew names. 

This Bible is stated to have been in the possession of Saint 
Louis, King of France. 

It would be difficult to find a more perfect example of a book 
of its kind. 

Bound in old French red morocco, gilt edges. 

Size, 7 X lOj inches. 



3 BIBLIA SACRA LATINA CUM PROLOGIS 
SANCTI HIERONYMI. Manuscript on Vellum. 
4°. XIII Century. 

An Italian manuscript on extremely fine vellum. Written at 
Cremona, about 1275, by Viviani Sani. A beautiful and re- 
markable volume, both as to execution and condition. There 
are fifty historiated initials and fifty-three other capitals, all 
illuminated in gold and colors. 

Bound in flexible rough calfskin, edges gilt and gauffered. 

Size, 6|- X 9^ inches. * 



4 LORRIS (G.) ET JEHAN DE MEUNG. Le Roman 
DE LA Rose. French Manuscript on Vellum. Small 
Folio. XIV Century. 

Upon one hundred and eighty leaves, in two columns, with 
two large and thirty-one small miniatures. Written and illu- 
minated for King Charles V. 

2 



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FROM THE HORATII CARMINA 
No. 37 



\ 



CATALOGUE 

Binding orange morocco inlaid with red, green and black 
morocco, doubled with red morocco, decorated with fleurs-de- 
lis, by Lortic. 

Size, 8x11^ inches. 



5 PSEAUTIER GOTHIQUE. Manuscript on Vellum. 
Large 4°. XV Century. 

French manuscript, with borders composed of scroll-work and 
flowers to each page, and thirty-one miniatures — thirteen large 
and eighteen small. 

Bound in red velvet with silver clasps, edges painted and 
gilded. 

Size, 7 X 9f inches. 



6 GRINGORE. Les Abus du Monde. Manuscript on 
Vellum. 8°. XV Century. 

French, written upon sixty-eight leaves of vellum, with four- 
teen full-page miniatures. 

The first printed edition of " Les Abus du Monde " is by 
Pierre le Dru, 1509, and contains all the miniatures reproduced 
in woodcuts. 

Presented by the author to the Due d'Estourteville. This 
MS. passed to Marie de Lorraine, wife of James V, King of 
Scotland, and afterward to his daughter Mary Stuart. 

It subsequently formed part of the libraries of Chas. Nodier, 
Yemeniz, and Bancel, and the latter had it rebound. 

3 



CATALOGUE 

Binding blue morocco, Janseniste, double with white vellum 
in gilt compartments of alternate thistles and marguerites, by 
Trautz-Bauzonnet. 

Size, 8 X sf inches. 



7 LIVRE D'HEURES. Manuscript on Vellum. 4°. 
XV Century. 

Written in the Italian style, with six pages of miniatures and 
borders ; also a number of fine initial letters painted upon bur- 
nished gold background. 

Old French red morocco, gilt edges, by Derome. 

Size, 3f X j^ inches. 



8 CARL ZENO. "IN LIBROS VYIM MORUM 
RERUM GESTARUM CAROLI ZENI." Manu- 
script ON Vellum. Folio. XV Century. 

Latin ; three hundred and eighty-two pages, in Roman script. 
An illuminated and historiated border and capital on the first 
page, and nine other illuminated capitals. Pope Pius II, to 
whom this volume was presented, was born in 1405 and died in 
1464. 

Bound in old red morocco, gold tooling. 

Size, 7-!^ X II inches. 



CATALOGUE 

9 LIVII HISTORIARUM DECAS PRIMA. Manu- 
script ON Vellum, in Roman Script. Folio. XV 
Century. 

Illuminated border to first page, in which are introduced the 
Caraccioli arms, and an initial F historiated with a view of 
Rome. Seven initial letters illuminated in gold and colors. 

This manuscript was brought from Palermo by Dr. Askew, at 
whose sale it was purchased by Sir W. Burrell. Purchased by 
Mr. Wodhull in 1798. 

Bound in old russia, borders of gold. 

Size, 10^ X 14I inches. 



10 HOR^ (AVEC CHANT N0T£). Manuscript on 
Vellum. Small 4°. XV Century. 

Written on three hundred and sixty leaves of fine vellum, 
and ornamented with a large number of illuminated initial let- 
ters, fifteen of which contain miniatures, the most of them upon a 
checkered or fleur-de-lis background in gold and colors. 

Bound in red morocco, silver clasps. 

Size, 5 X 6|^ inches. 



I I HOR^. Manuscript on Vellum. 4°. XV Century. 

Flemish ; containing thirteen miniatures. 
In the original stamped morocco binding. 
Size, sf X 8 inches. 

5 



CATALOGUE 

12 PSALTERIUM, CANTICA, HYMNI, SYMBOLA 
S. ATHANASII ET APOSTOLORUM, ETC. Man- 
uscript ON Vellum. Large 4°. XV Century. 

A Spanish manuscript of fine proportions and execution. It 
contains twelve miniatures with elaborate borders, and a number 
of large initial letters. 

Bound in old crimson velvet. "* 

Size, 6f X 9^^ inches. 



13 HOR^ BEAT^ MARI^ VIRGINIS. Manuscript 
ON Vellum. 4°. XV Century. 

This manuscript, which is of exceptional beauty and richness, 
was executed, about 1485, for Corneille Crosinck, Lieutenant 
Forestier of Holland, and his second wife, Hildegarde Van Alke- 
made. Their arms are found emblazoned twice on one of the 
borders, and their initials are painted on others. The borders and 
large initial letters, which are very numerous, are of great variety 
and elaboration. There are fourteen large miniatures, measuring 
3-|- X 5 inches exclusive of their borders ; also many smaller ones. 
These paintings, evidently by several different Flemish artists, 
are of the school of the Van Eycks. 

Bound in crimson velvet, gilt edges ; with silver clasps bearing 
the initials C. H. in relief 

Size, 6x8^ inches. 




FROM THE HOR/E 
No. 40 



CATALOGUE 

14 PRECES PIvE. Manuscript on Vellum. 8°. XV 
Century. 

The text written in Roman letters. 

A French manuscript, with sixteen large miniatures and forty- 
four small. The calendar is of unusual richness, and the borders 
of flowers, birds and insects are very delicately painted upon 
gold ground. 

Bound in red morocco, doubled with green, tooled with gold, 
gilt edges. 

SizCy 4^ X 'j\ inches. 



15 HORi^. Manuscript ON Vellum. 4°. XV Century. 

Flemish ; with borders to each page, and sixty-four minia- 
tures, interesting for their rude quaintness of expression and 
execution. 

Bound in brown morocco, gilt edges, by F. Bedford. 

Size^ 5x74 inches. 



16 OFFICES OF THE VIRGIN. Manuscript on 
Vellum. 4°. XV Century. 

By a French scribe ; with four miniatures, and burnished 
gold borders to each page. 

Bound in old red morocco, tooled sides, gilt edges, by Du 
Seuil. 

SizCy 5f X 7^ inches. 

6 7 



CATALOGUE 

17 OFFICIUM BEAT^ MARI^ VIRGINIS SECUN- 
DUM CONSUETUDINEM ANGLI.^. Manuscript 
ON Vellum. 4°. XV Century. 

From the prayers in this book being addressed to English 
Saints, as well as from the costumes of many of the figures, and 
the general character of the art in the miniatures, it would 
appear to be English. Sir Francis Palgrave, however, judged 
it to be French, and Sir F. Madden and Mr. Shaw considered 
it Flemish. It was possibly executed by foreign artists in 
England. The ornamentation throughout is extremely rich. 
There are twenty-three large miniatures and twenty smaller. 

Bound in brown morocco, doubled with red morocco, mosaics 
in colors on the sides, gilt edges, by Lortic. 

Size, 5f X 7f inches. 



18 HOR^ BEAT^ VIRGINIS. French Manuscript 
ON Vellum. 4°. XV Century. 

Borders, heightened with gold, to each page, and fourteen 
large miniatures. On the blank leaves at beginning and end have 
been painted coats of arms within green and blue borders. 

Bound in old French red morocco, paneled sides, gilt edges. 

Size, 6\ X 8f inches. 



CATALOGUE 

19 FLEMISH BOOK OF HOURS. Manuscript on 
THE Finest Abortive Vellum. 4°. XV Century. 

The borders of each page are of very delicate scroll-work, 
interspersed with flowers and small fruits. The large miniatures 
(twenty-nine in all) are examples of Flemish art at its best period. 
There are several hundred initial letters, illuminated and height- 
ened with gold. 

Bound in brown morocco, tooled sides and gilt edges, by 
F. Bedford. 

Size, Sf X 74 inches. 

20 HOR^ BEATyE MARI^ VIRGINIS CUM ALIUS 
OFFICIIS. Manuscript on Vellum. 8°. XV Cen- 
tury. 

A Flemish manuscript, with borders to each page; thirteen 
large and forty-six small miniatures. 

In the old calf binding, with sides stamped and tooled in gold, 
gilt edges. 

Size^ 5^ X 'j\ inches. 

21 HOR^ BEAT^ MARINE VIRGINIS. Manuscript 
ON Vellum. Small 4°. XV Century. 

By a French scribe. Ornamented with five large miniatures, 
and borders of flowers, fruits and insects, in gold and colors. 
Bound in old French red morocco, with silver- gilt clasp. 
Size, 5 X 6| inches. 

9 



CATALOGUE 

22 BOOK OF HOURS. Manuscript on Vellum. 8^. 
XV Century. 

Flemish. It has twelve large, delicately executed miniatures, 
with richly illuminated borders. 

Bound in brown morocco, panels in gold on the sides, gilt 
edges, by F. Bedford. 

Size, 5-J- X 7f inches. 



2} HOR^ BEAT^ VIRGINIS MARI.E IN USUM 
ROMAN UM. Manuscript on Vellum. Small 4°. 
XV Century. 

Probably Flemish work. The borders, composed of scroll- 
work, flowers, fruits, birds and insects, upon yellow ground, are 
of unusual brilliancy. It contains twelve large and eleven small 
miniatures of the school of Memling. 

Bound by F. Bedford, in brown morocco, gilt edges. 

Size, 4f X 6f inches. 



24 HOR^. Manuscript on Vellum. Small 4°. End 
OF XV Century. 

A French manuscript, written upon one hundred and twenty- 
one leaves of very fine vellum, with delicate borders to each 
page ; twenty-nine small and twelve large well-painted minia- 
tures, remarkable for breadth and boldness of treatment. 

10 




L 



J 



FROM THE BOOK OF HOURS 
No. 41 



CATALOGUE 

Binding of old green Renaissance velvet, upon oak boards, 
gilt edges. 

Size, 4f X 5f inches. 



25 HOR^ BEATiE MARI^ VIRGINIS. Manuscript 
ON Vellum. 4°. XV Century. 

French. Written on one hundred and sixty seven leaves, with 
delicate borders; twelve large finely painted miniatures, and 
many beautiful initial letters, some historiated. According to 
an inscription at bottom of the first page, following the cal- 
endar, it belonged to the " Monastery Celle Abbatis Sept^" 

Bound in old French red morocco, sides in gold panels, gilt 
gauffered edges. 
Size, 6 X 8f inches. 



26 BOOK OF HOURS. Manuscript on Vellum. Large 
8°. XV Century. 

Written upon one hundred and forty-five leaves; each page 
surrounded with brilliant and elaborate borders; also fifty-nine 
miniatures (twenty-three large and thirty-six small), all most 
carefully executed. The larger measure 3 x 5|- inches. Although 
the work in this manuscript is evidently French, it combines 
a mixture of Flemish, French and Italian styles of treatment, 
especially in the borders, some being pure arabesque, others 
composed of fruits and flowers, in the manner of the Touranian 

II 



CATALOGUE 

School, and all in gorgeous coloring. The arms of the person 
for whom the book was executed are painted in several places in 
the borders. 

Bound in old crimson velvet, gilt edges. 

Size, 5-2 X 8f inches. ^ 



27 HEURES. Manuscript on Vellum. 8°. XV Cen- 
tury. 

Of French execution. The borders are ornamented in the 
Italian arabesque style, upon grounds of various colors. The 
book has eleven full-page miniatures. 

Bound in Lavalliere morocco, inlaid with red morocco, gilt 
edges. The last mosaic binding done by Joly. 

Size, 3I X 6|- inches. 



28 BQOK OF HOURS. Manuscript on Vellum. 8°. 
XV Century. 

Flemish ; with delicate borders of flowers, fruits and scroll-work 
upon gold ground. It has fourteen full-page miniatures of 
Scriptural scenes, and twelve small miniatures in the calendar. 
The arms of the former owner are repeated several times in va- 
rious parts of the book. 

Bound by Joly, in brown morocco, with an original pattern in 
mosaic on the sides, and doubled with red morocco tooled in gold. 
The original gilt and painted edges preserved. 

Size, 5^ X 7"! inches. 

12 



CATALOGUE 

29 PRECES PI^. Manuscript on Vellum. Small 4°. 
XV Century. 

Flemish. With eleven full-page miniatures, and borders in 
gold and colors. 

Bound by Capd in green morocco doubled with red morocco, 
with dentelle borders, gilt edges. 

Size, 4f X 6f inches. 



30 PSALMONIUM. Manuscript on Vellum. 4°. XV 
Century. 

Probably French. With twenty miniatures and a number of 
delicate borders, some upon gold ground. 

Bound in brown morocco with mosaic medallions on sides, gilt 
edges, by Cape. 

Size, 7^x s\ inches. 



3 I HOR^. Manuscript on Vellum. 4°. XV Century. 

Of French execution, and containing eleven large miniatures 
of unusual delicacy and beauty. They are divided into upper 
and lower sections, picturing the various phases of the subjects 
treated. Some of the borders are composed of small figures. 

Bound by Le Gascon in red morocco, inlaid with colored mo- 
roccos, and covered with fine gold tooling in points and dotted 
lines, gilt edges. 

Size, 4^ X 6f inches. 

13 



CATALOGUE 

32 HORATIUS CARMINA. Manuscript on Vellum. 
In Folio. Early XV Century. 

An Italian manuscript, written on one hundred and forty-one 
leaves. 

It contains by way of frontispiece a painting upon yellow 
vellum in camaieu heightened with gold. The title " Q. Oratii 
Flacci Venusini Carminum liber primus incipit M. Antoninus 
Maurocenus Patricius Venet. Sibi et Suis. V. F." is upon an 
entablature, with a Faun and a Satyr on either side playing 
upon flutes. The original owner of the book. Marc Antonio 
Morosine, whose arms are emblazoned in an elaborate border, 
was a Venetian and a patron of Aldus, who dedicated to him 
his edition of Lucan, published in 1502. The manuscript is in 
roman letters, with notes in italic writing. There are beautiful 
initial letters and borders to each division of the text. The last 
leaf contains a life of Horace in Latin. 

Bound in oFd vellum. 

Size, 7f X II f inches. 



33 FRENCH AND LATIN HOURS OF HUBERT 
DU BERRY D'ARTOIS. Manuscript on Vellum. 
Small Folio. XV Century. 

A magnificent French manuscript, written upon two hundred 
and thirty-seven leaves of vellum. Each of the four hundred and 
seventy-three pages has a delicate and elaborate border com- 
posed of flowers, fruits, birds, insects and beasts, among which 
are centaurs, dragons and nondescripts. There are also hun- 

14 



\^o ant 
larttiivtm 

I AuDim ^^ t>w ^icaxtiH fa 
6i^ C3C0 inv aCtdnya . iS*^;5»it 
tir aH^(i«^uiA^ rtiniMfot 

I ttiut) HI n mnu fim-OMtio 
att^rtHtJtA till HiidiacAe ^ ] 



^-' 




.l«^?^ 



FROM THE HORi€ 
No. 49 



CATALOGUE 

dreds of fine capital letters, thirty-two large miniatures and 
twenty-four smaller in the calendar; all painted with great skill 
and brilliancy. The arms of Hubert du Berry, impaled with 
those of Pericard, are emblazoned in various parts of the volume. 

Bound in red velvet, the edges painted upon th^ gilt. 

Size^ 7f X lo^ inches. 



34 BOOK OF CALLIGRAPHY. In Folio. XV Cen- 
tury. 

A series of elegant designs executed upon vellum with great 
skill and accuracy. They comprise samples of ornamental al- 
phabets, borders, etc., in colors and gold. A unique and valu- 
able volume, as illustrative of the history of illumination. The 
designer is Guinifortus de Vicomerchato, and the work was done 
about 1450. 

The binding is cotemporary vellum. 

SizCy 94^ X 1 3-^ inches. 



35 HOURS OF THE VIRGIN. Manuscript on Fine 
Vellum. 4°. XV Century. 

A Flemish manuscript with rich borders of flowers, birds 
and insects upon a gold ground. It also has thirteen large 
and small miniatures, exquisitely painted in the best style of 
Flemish art of the period. The draperies in some of the sub- 
jects treated are possibly by a different hand from that which 

7 15 



CATALOGUE 

executed the heads, which are remarkable for fineness and 
beauty. The miniature of the Virgin and Child is considered 
by the most competent experts to be the work of Hans Mem- 
ling. 

Bound in old red morocco, covered with fine gold tooling, in 
the manner of Le Gascon, but probably executed in Holland. 

Size, 4f X 6f inches. 



36 SUETONII TRANQUILLE DE DUODECIM C^- 
SARIBUS; OPUS ELEGANTISSIMUM FELICI- 
TER ET PRIMO DE JULIO C^SARE. Manu- 
script UPON Paper. Folio. XV Century. 

The first page is surrounded by an elaborate border, with 
subjects painted in medallions. The book was evidently the 
property of a bishop, as indicated by the miter over the coat of 
arms. 

Bound in brown morocco, gilt edges. / 

SizCy 8^ X \\\ inches. 



37 HORATII CARMINA. Manuscript on Vellum. 
Folio. XV Century. 

An Italian manuscript, with five beautiful borders, headings in 
letters of gold and colors, and historiated initial letters, painted 
in camaieu, heightened with gold. This manuscript is in very 
fine and perfect condition, and exemplifies one of the best styles 

16 



CATALOGUE 

of Italian art. The arms of the original owner are at the bottom 
of the first page. 

Bound by Charles Lewis, in purple morocco, gilt gaufre edges. 

Size, 7^ X I if inclus. 



38 LIVRE D'HEURES. Manuscript on Vellum. 4°. 
XV Century. 

A French manuscript written upon one hundred and twenty- 
seven leaves. The calendar is in French, each page containing 
two miniatures, making twenty-four for this portion of the book. 
There are two hundred and fifty-four borders to the pages, and 
in all sixty-five miniatures, of which thirteen are page size. The 
work is possibly French, but there are indications of Flemish 
influence. 

Bound in Lavalli^re morocco, doubled with green ; the sides 
and back ornamented with a rich mosaic of colored moroccos, 
and the inside of the covers covered with gold tooling "a la 
fanfare " ; the work of David and Marius Michel. 

Size, S X 6f inches. 



39 HORi^. Manuscript on Vellum. 4°. XV Century. 

Flemish ; with borders to each page, and thirty-four minia- 
tures — eight large and twenty-six small. 

Bound by Thouvenin, in red morocco, richly tooled and 
doubled with green morocco, also tooled in gold, gilt edges. 

Size, 6| X 8^ inches. 

17 



CATALOGUE 
40 HOR-^. Manuscript on Vellum. 4°. XV Century. 

Of French execution, and written upon one hundred and 
eighty-seven leaves. It contains twenty-six full-page miniatures, 
surrounded by rich borders of scroll-work with birds, flowers, 
fruits, and figures of personages dressed in various contempo- 
rary costumes. The miniatures, with background of landscapes 
and architecture, are beautifully painted. 

Upon the inside of the cover is the indorsement, in Spanish, 
dated 1575, of the commission of the Lords of the Inquisition, to 
the effect that the manuscript had been examined by them. 
They have made one or two erasures in the text. 

Bound in crimson velvet, red edges, with silver clasps. 

Size, Sf X 7-| inches. 



41 BOOK OF HOURS. Manuscript on Vellum. 4°. 
XV Century. 

Written in France, about 1435, and upon one hundred and 
eighty-nine leaves. It has elegant borders of burnished gold 
surrounding each page. There are sixteen large miniatures, of 
unusual richness and careful execution. The borders to these, 
which are remarkably brilliant, are supposed to be by the same 
artist who decorated the Bedford Missal. At the bottom of 
one of the miniatures is the coat of arms of the Levis family : 
three chevrons sable on a gold field. 

. Bound in crimson morocco, with repousse plaque in silver on 
the side, and silver clasps. 
Size, 6x8^ inches. 

18 



\ 




FROM THE PRECES PI/E 
No. 50 



CATALOGUE 

42 WORM BEATiE VIRGINIS. Manuscript on Vel- 
lum. 4°. XV Century. 

Contains twelve large miniatures within full borders ; also a 
large number of initial letters of burnished gold. 

Bound in brown morocco, tooled sides and back to a Grolier 
pattern, gilt edges. 

Size, Sf X 8f inches. 



43 LIVRE D'HEURES. Manuscript on Vellum. Small 
4°. XV Century. 

A French manuscript, with colored borders to each page, 
and nine miniatures. 

Bound by Cape, in red morocco, with mosaics, covered with 
fine tooling in gold, and doubled with brown morocco, with 
dentelle borders, gilt edges. 

Size^ 4f X 6f inches. 



44 HORiE. Manuscript on Vellum. 8°. XV Century. 

Flemish manuscript, with borders to each page, and eleven 
large and forty-six small miniatures. 

Lyonese stamped and tooled binding of calfskin upon oak 
boards, gilt edges ; with the name Marie Chariot in gold on 
either side. 

Size, a^ x 7^ inches. 

19 



CATALOGUE 

45 HOR^ BEAT^ MARINE VIRGINIS. Manuscript 
ON Vellum. 4°. XV Century. 

French manuscript, executed for some noble lady, whose 
portrait is found kneeling before the standing figure of the Vir- 
gin and Child, and is supposed to be Margaret of Anjou, wife of 
Henry VI. 

The work of two artists is distinguishable in the paintings, of 
which there is an unusual number : fifty-one of large size, and 
twenty-four small. These miniatures, as well as the borders to 
the pages, are of extreme delicacy and beauty. Some of the 
prayers are in the French language. 

Bound by Riviere, in red morocco, doubled with green, richly 
tooled, gilt edges. 

Size, si" X 7 inches. ^ 



46 HOR^ BEAT^ MARI^ VIRGINIS. Manuscript 
ON Vellum. Small 4°. XV Century. 

A Flemish manuscript, containing ten full-page miniatures 
with borders, some including smaller miniatures or historiations. 
Bound in the original brown stamped morocco, gilt edges. 
Size, 5x7 inches. 



47 HORi^. Manuscript on Vellum. 8°. XV Century. 

Flemish ; eighteen miniatures, somewhat rude in execution, 
and without borders. 

20 



CATALOGUE 

It has been placed in an English chased-silver binding, with 
silver clasps and chain, probably made in the seventeenth 
century. 

Size, 4^ X 6\ inches. 



48 HORi^. Manuscript on Vellum. Small 4°. XV 
Century. 

Written upon the thinnest of fine Italian vellum, and probably 
in Italy. It contains twelve small and extremely delicate minia- 
tures in grisaille (red, blue and brown), heightened with gold. 

Bound in old brown morocco, tooled sides, by one of the Eves. 

Size, 4 X 5f inches. 



49 HOR^. Manuscript on Vellum. Small 4°. XV 
Century. 

Beautifully written French manuscript, enriched with twenty- 
six small miniatures of great delicacy of execution ; thirty-nine 
borders upon gold or colored ground, upon which are painted 
seven hundred and forty-six flowers, representing a large portion 
of the French flora of the epoch ; also seventy butterflies, eight 
birds, eighty-six branches of foliage and twelve hundred and 
forty-five illuminated letters. This enumeration gives some idea 
of the amount of work upon even the less elaborate manuscripts, 
of which this is an example. 

In the original vellum covers. 

Size, 4f X 6f inches. 

21 



CATALOGUE 

50 PRECES PliE. Manuscript on Vellum. 8°. XV 
Century. 

Of French execution, with five full-page miniatures, and bor- 
ders of burnished gold and colors. The text embraces the mu- 
sical annotation written upon red lines. 

Bound by Chambolle-Duru, in brown morocco, blind-tooled, 
gilt edges. 

Size, 4^ X 6^ inches. 



5 I HOR^ PEMBROCHIANiE. English Manuscript, 
UPON One Hundred and Ninety-five Leaves of Vel- 
lum. In Folio. About 1440. 

A remarkable and sumptuous volume of unusual historic and 
artistic interest. It was written for William Herbert, first Earl 
of Pembroke, and according to the most competent living author- 
ities upon such subjects, is entirely of English execution. In the 
middle of the sixteenth century it was still in the Pembroke family 
and in the hands of the grandson of the first Earl, who caused 
additional pages to be written with illuminations, including the 
Pembroke arms, and his portrait in a kneeling posture. The sup- 
plemental painting and writing, consisting of the Te Deum and 
prayers in English, is greatly inferior to that in the original 
work, which contains two hundred and sixty-eight miniatures, 
many richly illuminated borders, and a vast number of decorated 
initial letters. 

This manuscript seems to have found its way into Italy, whence 
it was obtained about 1880 by Mr. F. S. Ellis, of London, who 

22 




FROM THE HOR/€ PEMBROCHIAN/E 
No. 51 



CATALOGUE 

published in that year an account of the book, with detailed de- 
scriptions of each miniature, accompanied by facsimiles of several. 
The binding is in old crimson Renaissance velvet, upon wooden 
boards, having clasps and corner-pieces of silver engraved in the 
manner of Nielli, and probably dates from the latter part of the 
sixteenth or the early part of the seventeenth century. 
• Size^ %\y, \\\ inches. 



52 MINIATURE. On Vellum. By Giulio Clovio. XVI 
Century. 

The subject is the Crucifixion. St. John and soldier stand 
on the right, St. Mary Magdalen is at the foot of the cross, 
while on the left the Virgin has fallen fainting in the arms of 
the holy women. The whole is beautifully drawn, and the ex- 
pression of the faces admirable. Mr. Bradley, in his life of 
Clovio, states that the artist in his early days studied especially 
Diirer and Michelangelo. Later he was taken up with the 
work of Raffaelle, and still later with the Netherlandish painters, 
and " worked with a vast amount of patient stippling." 

This miniature formerly belonged to the Celloti collection, 
sold at Christie's in London in 1825. Later (1856) it was in 
the Wilson collection. It is engraved by Shaw in his " Decora- 
tive Arts- of the Middle Ages," and considered by him to have 
belonged to the volume executed for Gregory XIII, mentioned 
by Baglione in his work published in 1642. 

Framed. 

Size, 5f X 9^ inches. 

8 23 



CATALOGUE 

53 HOR^. Manuscript on Vellum. Small 4°. XVI 
Century. 

This manuscript is an exquisite example of Italian work, of 
the school of Giulio Clovio. An inscription at the end in French 
-States that it was written in the Noble House and Abbey of 
Saint Amand, in the Year of Grace 1537, at the request of 
Maistre Francois du Guelin. The miniatures, of which there 
are eleven, page size, are extremely fine and brilliant, and the 
drawing of these and the designs composing the borders are in 
the best Italian taste of the time. The initial letters, of which 
there are many, are also very beautiful. The volume is in the 
finest possible condition throughout. 

Bound by Joly, in red morocco, doubled with the same, and 
ornamented with tooling and mosaic of different colors, the 
edges gaufr^ 

Size, 4 X 53^ inches. 



54 PRECES PI^. Manuscript on Vellum. Large 4°. 
Early XVI Century. 

A French manuscript written in bold Gothic letters, with some 
of the inscriptions and prayers in the French language. It has 
one hundred and eighty-three miniatures, of which thirty- 
eight are full-page, and one hundred and forty-five smaller, 
varying in size. Some of the paintings extend across two pages, 
being about thirteen inches in length. 

Bound in red morocco, tooled sides, gilt edges, by F. Purgold. 

Size, 7f X 10 inches. 

24 




FROM THE HOR/t PEMBROCHlAN/€ 
No. 51 



CATALOGUE 
55 PASSIO DOMINI. i6°. XVI Century. 

Seventeen Italian miniatures upon vellum, depicting the 
Miracles of Christ, with descriptive text to each painting. 

Bound by C. Lewis, in olive morocco, doubled with morocco 
of the same color, tooled in gold, gilt edges. 

Size, 3^- X 4f inches. 



56 HORi^ BEAT^ MARIiE VIRGINIS. Manuscript 
ON Vellum. 16°. XVI Century. 

A French manuscript, with eleven full-page miniatures and 
many smaller; twelve historiated borders to the calendars, all 
finely executed and of extreme delicacy. 

Bound in old French olive morocco, gilt edges. 

Size, 2\ X 3f inches. * 



57 HEURES. GOTHIC. Manuscript on Vellum. 16°. 
Early XVI Century. 

Contains twelve large and twenty-one small miniatures, also 
forty-six borders of flowers and fruits, in colors and gold. 

Writing in the book states that it was, on the 20th of Decem- 
ber, 1552, bequeathed to the Reverend Father in God M. Nico- 
las, Abbe of St. Jay, by the Demoiselle Margharite Orohin. 

Newly bound in brown calf, blind-tooled, with the original 
clasp containing a miniature head of Christ. 

Size, 3I X 6^ inches. 

25 



CATALOGUE 

58 PRECES PI^. Manuscript on Vellum. 8°. XVI 
Century. 

Flemish. Containing eleven large and seventy-two small 
miniatures, the latter introduced in broad ornamented borders. 
The paintings are not in the best style of the art, but ex- 
tremely interesting, owing to their vigorous execution and the 
somber, serious tone pervading them all. This book possesses 
an additional interest from having on the first leaf the auto- 
graphic inscription of Jeanne de Malherbe, dated 1567; probably 
the mother or one of the family of Malherbe, the French poet. 

Bound in black morocco, by Koehler. 

Size^ 4|- X 6\ inches. 



^Ol OFFICIUM BEAT/E MARI^ VIRGINIS. Manu- 
script ON Vellum. Small 4°. XVI Century. 

An Italian manuscript, with three pages of elaborate minia- 
tures and borders combined. 

Bound by Gruel in brown morocco, blind-tooled, gilt edges, 
silver clasps. 

Size, 3-| X 5 inches. 

60 BONAVENTUR^ (SANCTI) PSALTERIUM 
BEAT.^ MARI^ VIRGINIS. Manuscript on Vel- 
lum. 12°. XVI Century. 

Written in Roman letters within gold line borders. It con- 
tains eight fine miniatures, beautifully painted by the Italian 

26 




FROM THE HOR/E 

No. 53 



CATALOGUE 

artist Frederico Baroccio of Urbino. The book was presented 
to Queen Christina of Sweden by Pope Alexander VII. She, 
before her death, gave it to her chaplain. 

Bound in black morocco, with silver clasps. 

Size^ 3f X 7f inches. 



6 1 LA GUIRLANDE DE JULIE. Manuscript on Vel- 
lum. XIX Century. 

Facsimile of the second and smaller of N. Jary's celebrated 
manuscripts containing the poems addressed to Mile, de Ram- 
bouillet. This copy was made by V. Bouton. 

Bound in blue morocco, with garlands of foliage on the sides, 
gilt edges. 

Size, 5x7^ inches. 



62 LATIN MISSAL. Manuscript on Vellum. Folio. 
XV Century. 

A German manuscript written in bold Gothic letters, two 
columns to the page, with six very large and sixteen smaller 
miniatures. Rich borders of flowers, insects, birds and scroll- 
work. 

The first two leaves have the arms of the original owner 
emblazoned in rich colors, full size of the page. 

Bound in old black morocco, gilt edges. 

Size, 9f X 13^ inches. 

27 



CATALOGUE 

63 TOURANIAN MISSAL. Manuscript on Vellum. 
Folio. XVI Century. 

Beautifully written upon very fine vellum, in Gothic characters, 
two columns to the page. As a work of art, this volume ranks 
with the best of its kind. The miniatures, of which there are five 
of large size (two of them measuring 7x10 inches) and seventeen 
smaller (2f x 3f inches), all surrounded by elegant borders, are 
the work of Touranian artists of the school of Jean Foucquet. 
Their execution is admirable, and, although French, they show 
the influence of the Italian art of the period. 

Bound in old crimson velvet, gilt edges. 

Size, 9x13^ inches. 



64 OFFICIUM BEAT^ VIRGINIS MARI^. Manu- 
script ON Vellum. 16°. XV Century. 

A most delicate and beautiful example of Italian work of the 
latter part of the fifteenth century. It was executed in 1498 
by Sigismundus de Sigismundis for Francesco Sfondrato, who 
became Bishop of Cremona and, in 1534, Cardinal. 

The following is the inscription by the artist, written in red 
ink, near the middle of the volume : 

"Expliciunt septem psalmi penitentiales in Casto Carpi die 
XXII Octobris MCCCCLXXXXVIIL per Sigismundum de Sigis- 
mondis de Carpo." 

It contains eleven miniatures (two with the Sfondrato arms), 
four borders, and many illuminated capital letters. 

28 



CATALOGUE 

The borders to the miniatures, which are arabesque in style, 
contain numerous small medallions with heads. 
Bound in blue velvet, gilt edges. 
Size, 3^^ X 4^ inches. 



65 HORi^. Manuscript on Vellum. 8°. XV Century. 

A French manuscript, with nine full-page miniatures care- 
fully painted. 

Bound by Duru, in brown morocco gilt, with the sides and 
back enameled in green and red to a Grolier design, gilt 
edges. 

Size, 4!^ X 6| inches. 



66 ANTIPHONALE. Manuscript on Vellum. XV 
Century. 

A Flemish manuscript adapted for church service, but exe- 
cuted with more than usual care; the text and music orna- 
mented with a vast number of small drawings of heads and 
masques cleverly done with the pen. There are eighteen minia- 
tures varying in size, some of them joined to borders consisting 
of flowers, birds, etc., painted upon yellow ground. 

In one of the borders is the date of its execution (1541). 

Bound in the original oak boards covered with stamped 
leather, with brass bosses, corners, clasps and feet. 

Size, 12 X i6f inches. 

29 



CATALOGUE 

67 HOR^ BEAT.^ VIRGINIS MARI^. Manu- 
script ON Vellum. Small 4°. XV Century. 

A French manuscript written upon one hundred and fifteen 
leaves of vellum, with fourteen full-page miniatures, and many 
illuminated borders and initial letters. 

Bound in purple velvet, gilt edges, and silver-gilt clasps. 

Size, ^\y.6 inches. 



68 HOR^ BEAT.^ VIRGINIS. Manuscript on Vel- 
lum. 12°. XV Century. 

A Flemish manuscript finely written, with thirteen large and 
a number of small miniatures. There are also many borders 
composed of flowers, insects, figures and animals. 

Bound in dark-blue velvet, gilt edges, with engraved silver- 
gilt corner-pieces and clasps. 

Size, 3f X 5 inches. 



69 HOR^. Manuscript on Vellum. Small 4°. XV 
Century. 

An admirable manuscript upon three hundred and thirty-four 
leaves and made for the Regente Anne de Beaujeu, daughter of 
Louis XI of France. It is remarkable for the beauty and origi- 
nality of its miniatures, of which there are twenty-four in the 
calendar and one hundred and seven full size of the page, repre- 
senting scenes in the life of Christ, subjects taken from the Old 

30 




■ o 'i -ya i^iM ' III ijMMiiMiMfafM- 



FROM THE PSALTERIUM 
No. 60 



CATALOGUE 

Testament, and others, secular in character, picturing fetes, pro- 
cessions, banquets, etc. These miniatures, of a high order of 
merit, are of the school of Jean Foucquet, if not in part by this 
master, who at the time of their painting (1477) was still living 
and about 60 years old. The book was probably ordered by 
Louis XI for his daughter, as he had caused one of a similar char- 
acter to be executed for Marie de Cleves, Duchesse d'Orleans, 
mother of Louis XIL 

Bound in red morocco, by Le Gascon, gilt edges, with clasps. 

Size, 44" X 5f inches. 



70 MISSAL. Manuscript on Vellum. 8°. XV Century. 

A manuscript of the Flemish School, containing thirteen full- 
page and twenty-one small miniatures ; richly colored scroll bor- 
ders with varied designs on almost every page. 

Bound in old black leather, with gilt coat of arms of the period, 
silver clasps. 

Size, 4 X 6| inches. 



7 1 MISSAL. Manuscript on Vellum. 16°. XV Cen- 
tury. 

A manuscript of the Venetian School, containing six full-page 
miniatures and nineteen small ones, on rich arabesque ground 
of pique gold, after the manner of the enameled frescos of San 
Marco. 

Bound in crimson morocco, eighteenth century. 

Size, 3 X 4^^ inches. 

9 31 



CATALOGUE 

72 MISSAL. Manuscript on Vellum. Small 4°. XV 
Century. 

A French manuscript of the Lyons School, containing fourteen 
full-page miniatures. 

Bound by Lortic Freres, 1889. 
Sizey 3-2 X 54 inches. 



73 MISSAL. Manuscript. Small 4°. XVI Century. 

Chiefly interesting on account of rich silver repousse Louis 
XV binding, with repousse silver clasp. 
Size, 4f X 6 inches. 



74 MISSALE ROMANORUM. Manuscript on Vellum. 
8°. XV Century. 

Sixteen full-page miniatures and eighteen small ones. 
Bound by Matthews, in dark-blue crushed levant. 
Size, 4-|^ X 6| inches. 



75 PRECES. Manuscript on Thin Vellum. Small 4°. 
XVI Century. 

French manuscript on twenty-two leaves of vellum. One full- 
page miniature, and one page with richly decorated borders. All 

32 




FROM THE TOURANIAN MISSAL 
No. 63 



CATALOGUE 

the other pages with exquisite insects and flowers in their natu- 
ral colors on the margins. The book was praised by the former 
owner, T. F. Dibdin, in 1828, as of unsurpassed delicacy and 
beauty. 

Bound by Lewis, in smooth morocco, with a side of the origi- 
nal old stamped leather binding inserted on the inner side of 
the back cover. 

Size, 3^ X 4^ inches. 



76 OFFICIUM PURISSIMAE ET IMMACULATAE 
CONAPTIONES DEIPARI VIRGINIAE MARIAE, 
AD MATUTINEM. Manuscript on Vellum. Small 
4°. XVII Century. 

French manuscript on fine vellum. Full of the most perfect 
pen-and-ink minute interlacings and initials in black and gray. 

Bound in crimson morocco with gilt border, probably eigh- 
teenth century. 

SizCy 3^ X 4"^ inches. 



77 MISSAL. Manuscript on Vellum. Small 4°. XV 
OR XVI Century. 

Six full-page miniatures surrounded by rich floriated borders, 
the six opposite pages having borders to match. Numerous 
gilt and illuminated initials throughout the text. 

Bound in green morocco, with gilt metal framework cover- 
ing the outside of the front cover, an ivory carving of the Cru- 



CATALOGUE 

cifixion in the center, and four colored stones on the corners ; 
two small gilt clasps. Between the stones are metal seals em- 
blematic of Luke, John, Matthew, and Mark. Red edges, with 
gilt design running through the red. 
Size, 3 X 4f inches. 



78 SPANISH PATENT OF NOBILITY. Manuscript 
ON Vellum. Folio. XVIII Century. 

Issued in 17 10 by Philip V, King of Spain, to Don Francisco 
Aznar. Four large, rich, and fine paintings. 

Bound in Spain, eighteenth century, in brown leather with gilt 
designs. 

Size, 7|- X I if inches. 



79 PRAYER BOOK. Manuscript on Vellum. Small 
4°. XV Century. 

Flemish. Calendar, twelve leaves. Text, one hundred and, 
twenty leaves. 

Five miniatures in capital letters ; thirty-eight small ; subject 
in margin ; done with pen in filigree red and blue. 

In the original binding in oak boards and brown calf, with 
crests and fleurs-de-lis on covers. Silver- gilt clasps, one repre- 
senting St. Catherine, the other St. Anne, Virgin and Child. 

Purchased in i860 at the sale of the late Jean de Meyer at 
Ghent. 

Size, 4f X 6|- inches. 

34 



CATALOGUE 

80 SPANISH PATENT OF NOBILITY. Manuscript 
ON Vellum. Folio. XVIII Century. 

Issued by Philip V, King of Spain, in 1721 to De La Barra. 
Six full-page miniatures, thirty-six richly illuminated lines, with 
miniatures for initials. 

Bound in old maroon silk velvet, with brocade ribbons instead 
of clasps. 

Size, ^\ y. 11 f inches. 



81 SPANISH PATENT OF NOBILITY. Manuscript 
ON Vellum. Folio. XVIII Century. 

Issued by Charles III, King of Spain, in 1775 to Don Ramon 
Zazo y Ortega. Four full-page and twenty smaller miniatures. 

Bound in Spain, eighteenth century, in crimson leather with 
gilt border. 

Size, 71^ X II f inches. 



82 ITALIAN DIPLOMA. Manuscript on Vellum. In 
Folio. XVII Century. 

Issued by the University of Padua in 1680 to a Doctor of 
Medicine. Two full-page miniatures, and twenty- four pages 
with broad illuminated borders. 

Blue cardboard cover. 

Size, 6| X 9y^ inches. 

35 



CATALOGUE 

83 MINIATURE. On Vellum. XV Century. 

Large initial letter O inclosing a miniature of the Holy 
Trinity and six Apostles. 
Size, 6x6 inches. 



84 BOOK OF HOURS. Manuscript on Vellum. 4°. 
XV Century. 

Written in the German language, in Gothic letters, and con- 
taining five miniatures painted upon gold backgrounds. 
In a silver-gilt repousse and engraved binding, gilt edges. 
Size, 4^ X 6 inches. 



85 SIX LEAVES Cut from an Illuminated Manu- 
script ON Vellum. XV Century. 

Flemish. The large initial letters historiated as follows : 
First. The Nativity. 

Size, 6\ X 6f inches. 
Second. ADORATION OF THE Magi. 

Size, 6f X 6f inches. 
Third. GoD Speaking to David. 

Size, 6\ X 6f inches. 
Fourth. The Resurrection. 

Size, 5^ X 6 inches. 
Fifth and Sixth. HoLY FAMILIES. 

Fifth — size, 4 x 4|- inches. Sixth — size, 4^ x \\ inches. 

36 




FROM THE TOURANIAN MISSAL 
No. 63 



CATALOGUE 

86 HOR^. Manuscript on Vellum. Small 4°. XV 
Century. 

A French manuscript, containing eleven miniatures with bor- 
ders. The first one represents the owner of the book kneeling 
at an altar, with two Saints standing behind him, and on the 
reverse of the leaf his coat of arms and initials. 

Bound in old French red morocco (with the arms of Jean du 
Bouchet, Conseiller du Roi, who died in 1685), edges gilt. 

Size 3f X 5f inches. 

87 VOLUME Containing Twenty Miniatures on Vel- 
lum. Small 4°. XV Century. 

A series of small Italian miniatures, inlaid in vellum leaves, 
within gold borders. They represent the Passion of Christ and 
pictures of Saints. 

Bound in crimson velvet, gilt edges. 

Size, 3^ X 5^ inches. 



88 HOR.^ BEATiE MARIi^ VIRGINIS. Manuscript 
on Vellum. Small 4°. XV Century. 

A French manuscript, written upon two hundred and twenty- 
three leaves, with twenty miniatures in grisaille, mostly repre- 
senting the Passion. 

Bound by Lortic, in red morocco, inlaid with green morocco, 
delicately tooled, gilt edges. 

Size, 3f X 4^ incites, 

n 



CATALOGUE 

89 MINIATURE. On Vellum. XV Century. 

Large initial letter N with a miniature of the Morning after 
the Resurrection. 
Size, 6^x6\ inches. 



90 OFFICES OF THE VIRGIN. Manuscript on Vel- 
lum. 16°. XV Century. 

French manuscript, containing three miniatures with borders, 
and various large initial letters in gold and colors. 
Bound in old blue morocco, gilt edges. 
Size, 2f X 3f inches. 



91 OFFICES OF THE VIRGIN. Manuscript on Vel- 
lum. Small 4°. XV Century. 

Flemish ; with a number of delicately painted borders of flow- 
ers, insects, etc. 

Bound in russia leather, gilt edges. 
Size, 3-| X 4f inches. 



92 PETRARCA (F.) RIME. Manuscript on Vellum. 
8°. XV Century. 

An Italian manuscript, written in italics, with the capital let- 
ters in gold on blue ground. Ornamented with five full-page 
designs, with miniatures (one on saffron and one on purple vel- 

38 







5 o 



CATALOGUE 

lum), in the style of Mantegna. The upper part of the fron- 
tispiece consists of an elaborate entablature in which are the 
portraitures of Petrarca and Laura. The miniature, upon purple 
vellum, painted in gold and silver, represents the Triumphi. 
Rabbits and birds are introduced in the border to the title. 
The arms of the owner, at the bottom of the page, surmounted 
by a cardinal's hat, have been erased. 

In old Medicean stamped binding, with medallions on the 
sides ; gilt gaufre edges. 

Size, 6x9 inches. 



93 HORyE BEAT^ MARI^ VIRGINIS. Manu- 
script ON Vellum. 4°. XV Century. 

Flemish ; with eleven miniatures within borders. 
Bound in green morocco, doubled with red morocco, and cov- 
ered with minute gold tooling in the style of Le Gascon. 
Size, 6f X 9 inches. 



94 A VOLUME Containing a Series of Thirty-two 
Early Miniatures, upon Vellum, of Initial Letters, 

HiSTORIATED WITH FiGURES. 4°. XV CeNTURY. 

These paintings, cut from various manuscripts, are mounted, 
and bound in brown morocco, silver corners and clasp, with 
carved medallions in ivory inserted in the covers. 
10 39 



CATALOGUE 

95 CLOVIO (GIULIO), SCHOOL OF. ATTRIB- 
UTED BY MR. BRADLEY TO G^« BOCCAR- 
DINO. Miniature on Vellum, representing the 
Martyrdom of St. Luke and the Fall of the Idols. 
XVI Century. Miniature on Vellum, representing 
THE Crucifixion of St. Francis. XVI Century. 

On back of each of above is an intercessory prayer to the 
saint represented. 

Size of each miniature, including border , 'j\ x 5^ inches. 

96 LIBER PRECUM. Manuscript on Vellum. 4°. XV 
Century. 

Calendar in French ; prayers in Latin ; three hundred and 
seventy-four pages ; fifteen large miniatures. An illuminated 
border to each page and a large number of initial letters in 
gold and colors. 

Bound in old red morocco, gold tooling, with arms of Villeroy, 
Archbishop of Lyons, on side. Edges painted with flowers over 
the gilding. 

Size, 6|^ X 9 inches. 

97 OFFICIUM B.V. M. Italian Manuscript on Vellum. 
16°. XV Century. 

Latin, three hundred and twenty-nine pages; fifteen illumi- 
nated and historiated capital letters. 

Bound in silver-gilt repousse, ornamental designs with arms 
in center. 

Size, 2\ X 3-| inches. 

40 




O Ov 

2 z 

>< 

iZ 

u 

Of 

u 



98 



y CATALOGUE 

HORi^. B. MARI.^ VIRGINIS SECUNDUM USUM 
ROMANUM CUM CALENDARIO. Manuscript on 
Vellum. 8°. XV Century. 

Latin, three hundred and six pages within illuminated borders 
composed of flowers, fruit, birds, etc., ornamented with eleven 
full-page miniatures and twenty-four small subjects in calendar. 

Bound in old red morocco inlaid with varicolored leathers, 
and elaborately tooled. Arms of a former owner in center. 
This book subsequently belonged to the Marquis de Menars, and 
has his arms illuminated on fly-leaf before the calendar. 

Size^ 4|- X 7 inches. 



99 HOR^ INTEMERAT^ VIRGINIS MARI.^ SE- 
CUNDUM USUM ROMANUM. Manuscript on 
Vellum. Small 4°. XV Century. 

A French manuscript by a first-rate artist, with eighty- two 
superb miniatures, some of them in camaieu gris heightened with 
gold. The borders surrounding each page are extremely rich 
and varied, with flowers, fruits, insects, vases, columns, dragons, 
shells, etc. The initials F. M. are introduced in several places, 
and at the end is the coat of arms of the owner, and the inscrip- 
tion " Horas presentes facit facere Franciscus de Mello pro So- 
rore sua Domina Maria Manuel," 

Bound in old Italian red morocco covered with gold tooling, 
gilt edges. 

Size, 54 X 7f inches. 

41 



CATALOGUE 

100 HOR^ B. MARIi^ VIRGINIS. Manuscript on 
Vellum. t6°. XV Century. 

Latin, four hundred and twenty-seven pages. The calendar 
is curious and unusual, containing a number of zodiacal signs 
and drawings. Large number of illuminated borders with 
figures of insects, birds, and nondescripts. 

Bound in modern vellum. 

Size, 3 X 4^^ inches. 



42 



PERSIAN AND 
INDIAN MANUSCRIPTS. 



lOI HADJA HAFIZ. Persian Manuscript. Large 8°. 
(s. D.) 

Manuscript on a bluish paper, powdered with gold, written 
within gold lines. The complete works of the poet Hafiz. Illu- 
minated preface and title-page. 

Folding leather binding, stamped and painted with gold. 

Size, 6^ X ^ inches. 



102 RISSALIHI — NOURICH. TREATISE UPON 
MYSTICISM AND POETRY. Persian Manu- 
script. 8°. 1234 OF THE HeJIRA. 

A beautiful manuscript written on an ornamental gold ground 
within lines of gold and colors, with thirteen miniatures and four 
elaborately decorated pages. 

Persian enameled binding, painted inside and outside the cov- 
ers with jflowers and birds. 

Size, 5 X 7f inches. 

43 



CATALOGUE 

103 TASHRIHOOL AKWAM. Indian Manuscript. 
Folio. 1825. 

This manuscript contains one hundred and twenty-two minia- 
tures illustrative of the different castes of Hindustan, with an his- 
torical account of them, commencing with Vishnu, who had his 
origin in the Divine Essence. The pages of the text and the 
miniatures are within gold borders. 

Bound in blue morocco, gilt edges, by Chas. Lewis. 

Size, 8^ X \2\ inches. 



104 BOSTAN UL MOHADDITHIN, BY CHAH ALI 
SAHIB OF DELHI. Persian Manuscript Written 
IN Fine Characters. 8°. About 1771. 

The first two and the last two pages are richly ornamented in 
gold and colors. 

Bound in red morocco. 
Size, 6 X 8f inches. 



105 



THE BOOK OF THE KINGS OF PERSIA. 

An Old Persian Manuscript. Folio, (s. d.) 

Sixty-four paintings, portraits of kings, holy men, women, 
etc., executed with perfection and elaboration. Each miniature 
is surrounded with decorated border. 

In Persian enameled binding, with conventional flowers and 
foliage in bright colors. ♦ ' 

Size, 9x12 inches. 

44 




J^ O^J 



^^v>^:jg>i»>:i^"^>i5S>>cjgoi»^r#cxj»2^^ 










I 



I 






FROM THE BOOK OF THE KINGS OF PERSIA 
No. 103 



CATALOGUE 

1 06 ARABIC PRAYER BOOK. Manuscript with 
Interlineal Persian Translation. 8°. XVIII 
Century. 

Beautifully written within gold lines on a delicate green 
ground, and decorated with several brilliantly illuminated pages 
in gold and colors, in which are represented the Kaaba at 
Mecca and the Mosque at Medina. 

Persian folding binding, painted with flowers, etc. 

SizCy 6J X 9f inches. 



107 THE KORAN. Persian Manuscript. Large 8°. 

An old manuscript written upon thin paper between ornamen- 
tal gold lines and within gold borders. It has six illuminated 
pages. 

Persian binding, painted with flowers. 

SizCy Sf X 9f inches. 



108 KORAN. Persian Manuscript. 8°. XVIII Century. 

An exquisite piece of work, written upon gold ground, with 
the translation in Arabic interlined in red. There are delicate 
illuminations and borders accompanying the text, and elaborate 
introductory pages. 

Persian binding, brilliantly enameled outside and inside the 
covers. 

Size^ 5x8^ inches. 

45 



CATALOGUE 

109 AKBUR NAMMEH. Persian Manuscript. Folio. 
XVII Century. 

Written in Arabic, and containing a large number of brilliant 
and delicately executed minatures. 

In Persian binding, with paintings on the sides of girls dan- 
cing before the court. 

Size, %\ y. \\\ inches. 



no PERSIAN MANUSCRIPT. 12°. XVIII Century. 

Finely written and illuminated with miniatures and ornaments 
of flowers in gold and colors. 
In Persian painted binding. 
Size, i\ X 5|- inches. 



I I I Persian Manuscript on Vellum. Folio. XVII or 
XVIII Century. 

A poem by Sadi in the middle of the pages, surrounded by a 
poem by Roustan, the latter serving as a margin. Six minia- 
tures 12x8 centimeters, three full-page illuminated illustrations, 
and three small illuminations. 

Ornamented binding, supposed to be of eighteenth century, in 
brown morocco, with gold arabesque designs in relief; double 
in blue and maroon morocco, with designs in relief. 

Size, 61 X I of inches. 

46 




FROM THE BOOK OF THE KINGS OF PERSIA 
No. 105 



CATALOGUE 

I 12 VOLUME OF PERSIAN MINIATURES. In Folio. 

Twenty-eight old Persian paintings, embracing a variety of 
subjects finely executed. 

Bound in old English red morocco, gilt edges. 
Size^ 12 X 15 inches. 



113 KORAN. Arabic Manuscript. Folio. XVIII Cen- 
tury. 

Beautifully written between ornamental gold lines, and with 
borders in gold to each page, composed of flowers and foliage. 
The illuminated pages are of extremely fine execution. 

In an elaborate Persian binding, painted inside and out with 
flowers in gold and colors. 

Size^ 7^ X 1 2 inches. 



114 "TAHFETUL EBRAD." A Collection of Admo- 
nitions IN Verse, by Sheikh Abdul Rahman. Per- 
sian Manuscript of the year 992 of the Hejira, 
OR about a. D. 1600. 

The text is written within broad decorated borders. There 
are two miniatures, and several elaborately decorated pages. 
Old Persian folding binding, gilt and painted. 
Size, ^\ X \\\ inches. 

II 47 



CATALOGUE 

I I 5 KORAN (The 30TH Part). Persian Manuscript. IX 
Century of the Hejira (XV Century A. D.). 

Written in large gold letters, with ornaments of blue and 
gold. 

Persian cloth binding. 
Size, 8^ X II f inches. 



I 16 PERSIAN MANUSCRIPT. In Folio. XVIII Cen- 
tury. 

A Romance, written in double columns within gold lines. 
Some elaborately decorated preliminary pages, and a large num- 
ber of brilliantly colored miniatures. 

Persian binding in red morocco stamped and painted. 

Size, sf X 10^ inches. 



48 




FROM THE PERSIAN MANUSCRIPT AKBUR NAMMEH 
No. 109 



PRINTED BOOKS 
WITH ILLUMINATIONS. 

117 HEURES A L'USAGE DE ROUAN. Large 8°. 
Imprime pour Simon Vostre, Paris, 1508. 

The large Hours of Simon Vostre, printed upon vellum, with 
engraved borders to each page ; twenty-four fine paintings upon 
the large plates, and many illuminated initial letters. 

Bound by Cape, in brown morocco, gilt and blind-tooled, gilt 
edges. 

118 PONTANI OPERA OMNIA. Three Volumes. 8°. 
, Venice: Aldus, 15 18. 

The title-page surrounded by a brilliant border designed in 
gold upon a red ground, and initial letters throughout painted 
in gold and colors. 

Special copies of books from the Aldine press were some- 
times illuminated in this manner. 

Bound by Cape, in crimson morocco, with panels of olive 
morocco on the sides; tooled in gold, in the style of the Re- 
naissance, gilt edges. 

49 



CATALOGUE 

II9LIVRE D'HEURES. Large 8°. Paris: Antoine 
Verard, 1488. 

Copy upon paper, with the whole of the borders and engraved 
plates colored. 

Bound by Lortic, in brown morocco, blind-tooled, and doubled 
with red morocco, gilt edges. 



120 HEURES A L'USAGE DE ROME. 8°. Paris: 
Hardouyn, 1505. 

Printed upon vellum, with eighteen engravings richly and 
carefully painted. 

Bound in green morocco, with gold borders on the sides, gilt 
edges, by Derome. 



121 LE PREMIER SECOND ET TIERS VOLUME 
DE EUGUERRAN DE MONSTRELLET ENSUY- 
UANT FROISSART Nagueres Imprime A Paris. 
Des Cronicques DE France, Dangleterre, Descoce, 

DeSPAIGNE DE BrETAIGNE DE GaSCOGNE DE FlANDRES ET 

Lieux Circonvoisins. Imprimez a Paris pour Anthoine 
Verard (about i 500). Three Volumes in Two. Folio. 

Copy on vellum, printed in gothic type, with six miniatures full 
size of the page, and one hundred and fifty-nine smaller. 

The binding is a chef-d'oeuvre of Lortic, in dark morocco inlaid 
with variegated colors, and elaborately tooled with a combination 

50 



CATALOGUE 

of ornaments taken from sixteenth-century motives. It is the 
only one of the pattern executed by this binder, and was ex- 
hibited by him at the French Exposition in Paris in 1878. 
Size, 9^^ X 12^ inches. 



\22 HORE DIVINE MARIE SECUNDUM USUM 
ROMANUM. 8°. Hardouyn, 1518. 

Printed upon vellum, with engraved borders, and having the 
large plates painted in gold and colors in imitation of miniatures. 

Bound in black morocco, blind-tooled, gilt edges, by F. 
Bedford. 



123 ARETINUS (BRUNUS), DE BELLO ITALICO 
ADVERSUS GOTTHOS. Folio. Venetiis: N. 
Jensen, 1471. 

With painted initial letters and fine border in colors on the first 
page. 

Bound in red morocco, borders of gold, gilt edges, by Bozerian 
Jeune. 

I24AURELII AUGUSTINI. DE CIVITATE DEI. 

Folio. Venice, 1470. 

Printed upon vellum, with the first page of the text and the 
initial letters illuminated in gold and colors. 
Bound in brown morocco, by Marius Michel. 

51 



CATALOGUE 

125 CICERO. TUSCULAN^ QU^STIONES. Folio. 
Venetiis, per Nicolaum Jensen, 1472. 

Copy printed upon eighty-four leaves of vellum, with the 
initials painted with great care in gold and colors. Four copies 
only of this book are known upon vellum. 

Bound in old blue morocco, gilt edges. 

126 HORE BEATE MARIE VIRGINIS AD USUM 
PARISIESEM. Small 4°. Paris, 1498. 

Printed upon vellum in gothic type, with the view of imitating 
as nearly as possible the manuscript books of Hours. The capi- 
tal letters and the borders are all executed in free-hand in colors, 
while the subjects of the large illustrations are engraved in out- 
line only, to facilitate the work of the miniaturist, who has 
painted them in a conventional, mechanical manner. The result 
is deceptive to a casual observer. 

Bound in old brown morocco inlaid with colored leathers, 
and tooled to a Grolier pattern. 

Size^ 4^ X 6|^ inches. 

127 HEURES A L'USAGE DE ROME tout au long, 
Imprimiees a Paris par Guillaume Anabat, 1507. 
Large 8°. 

With very richly engraved borders ; the large plates as well 
as the small ones in the text and all the capital letters painted 
in colors, and heightened with gold. 

Bound in old Renaissance red velvet, gilt edges. 

52 



CATALOGUE 

128 HOR^ DIVINE VIRGINIS MARIE. Printed on 
Vellum in Roman type, by Germain Hardouyn, Paris; 
no date, but with almanac for i52o to 1 53 2; ninety- 
SIX leaves; TWENTY-NINE LINES TO PAGE. 

Twenty-one full-page and twelve quarter-page illuminated 
miniatures. 

Bound by Matthews, in crimson crushed levant morocco 
extra, gilt back and g^ilt edges. 

Size^ 4x6 inches. 



129 JUSTINIANI IMPERATORIS AUTHENTIC^ 
SIVE NOVELLA CONSTITUTIONES, ETC. 
CoDicis CUM Glossis. Folio. Moguntle: P. Schiaf- 

FER, 1477. 

Initial letters and borders illuminated in gold and colors. 
Bound in old russia. 



Size, II X 15^ inches. 



130 ^MILII PROBI (i. e., CORNELII NEPOTIS). 
Folio. Venetiis: N. Jensen, 1470. 

The first edition, ornamented with initial letters in colors, and 
a beautiful and elaborate Italian miniature border surrounding 
the first page. 

Bound in green morocco with tooled sides and back, gilt 
edges, by Roger Payne. 

53 



CATALOGUE 

1 3 I HEURES Imprimeis par Jean de la Roche ; Paris, 
1 5 14; POUR Guillaume Eustace, Libraire du Roy. 

Printed on vellum in gothic type, nineteen illuminated full- 
page miniatures, fourteen illuminated smaller miniatures, nine 
illuminated full-page borders. 

Bears the ex-libris stamp of the " Abbaye de Tard." 

Binding full red morocco, with fine gold tooling; probably 
done in France during the eighteenth century. 

Size, 5x8 inches. 



132 VALLENSIS (LAURENTII) COMMENTARII 
GRAMMATICE SECUNDUM ELEGANTIAM 
LINGUA LATINS. Folio. Venetiis: N. Jensen, 
1471. 

Illuminated border to first page (in which are the Wodhull 
arms), and seven initial letters illuminated in gold and colors. 

Bound in old citron morocco, borders of gold; probably by 
Derome. 

Size, 2)\x 13^ inches. 

133 HEURES A L'USAGE DE ROME. 8°. Paris: 
Guillaume Anabat, Imprimeur, 1500. 

Printed upon vellum, and with all the engraved plates and 
borders richly painted in gold and colors. 

Bound in dark brown morocco, blind-tooled, gilt edges, by 
Thivet. 

54 




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b«o«»«ftbona hoc mODquJ.riiljratr babc.it «p oia 
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FROM THE JUSTINIANI 
No. 129 



CATALOGUE 

134 PLYNII NATURALIS HISTORIA. Large Folio. 
Venetiis: N. Jensen, 1472. 

The initial letter contains the Bagneri arms, illuminated in 
gold and colors ; opposite a curious flourish in colors of the 
word Jesus, with sporting subjects and the Bagneri arms re- 
peated. 

From the WodhuU sale. This book has been designated 
" The Glory of Jensen's Press." 

Bound in gilt russia leather, by Roger Payne, with Wodhull 
arms in gold on sides. 

Size, I of X 15^ inches. 

135 HEURES A L'USAGE DE ROME. 8°. Imprime 
PAR Guillaume Anabat, Paris, le i^* Octobre, 1505, 
POUR Germain Hardouyn. 

Printed upon vellum, with engraved borders to each page, and 
having the full-page plates painted as miniatures. 
Bound in old brown morocco, gilt edges. 

136 BOUCHET (JEHAN). LAMOUREUX TRANSY 
SANS ESPOIR. 4°. Paris: A. Verard. 

Without date, but about 1500. Printed upon vellum in 
gothic type, and containing twenty miniatures, illuminated in 
gold and colors. 

A very rare book, not quoted by Brunet. 

Bound, in old red morocco, gold borders, edges gilt. 

12 55 



CATALOGUE 
137 LIVRE D'HEURES. Large 8°. Imprimees A Paris 

PAR GUILLAUME AnABAT POUR GiLLET ET GeRMAIN 

Hardouyn, 1507. 

Printed upon vellum, with the border of every page richly and 
elaborately painted in gold and colors. 
Bound in old red morocco, by Derome. 



56 



A LIST OF SOME OF THE MOST 

IMPORTANT BOOKS UPON 

OLD MANUSCRIPTS. 

LES ARTS SOMPTUAIRES HISTOIRE DU COS- 
TUME ET DE L'AMEUBLEMENT AVEC TEXTE 
EXPLICATIF PAR CH. LOUANDRE. Four Vol- 
umes. 4°. Paris, 1857. 

This work contains a large number of chromo-lithographic fac- 
similes of miniatures and ornaments from old manuscripts. 



LE MOYEN AGE ET LA RENAISSANCE. Histoire 
ET Description des Mceurs et Usages, du Commerce 

ET DE L'InDUSTRIE, DES ScIENCE, DES ArTS, DES LlTTE- 
RATURES ET DES BeaUX-ArTS EN EUROPE. DIRECTION 
LiTTERAIRE DE M. PaUL LaCROIX. DIRECTION ArTIS- 

TiQUE M. Ferdinande Sere. Dessins fac-simile par 
M. RivAUD. Five Volumes. 4°. Paris, 1848- 185 1. 

Contains articles upon calligraphy, illumination, and miniature 
painting, with chromo-lithographic reproductions. 

57 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

DRESSES AND DECORATIONS OF THE MID- 
DLE AGES, BY Henry Shaw, F. S. A. Two Vol- 
umes Large 8°. London, 1843. 

Contains a large number of colored illustrations from old 
manuscripts, with descriptive text. 



LABARTE (JULES). HISTOIRE DES ARTS IN- 
DUSTRIELS AU MOYEN AGE ET A L'EPOQUE 
DE LA RENAISSANCE. Six Volumes. 4°. Paris: 

LiBRAIRIE DE A. MOREL & ClE., 1 864- 1 866. 

The work consists of four volumes of text and two of illustra- 
tions in gold and colors. Reproductions of miniatures from 
manuscripts are in Vol. II of the illustrations. 

One hundred copies were printed on large paper. 



LES MANUSCRITS A MINIATURES DE LA 
BIBLIOTHEQUE DE LAON ETUDIES AU 
POINT DE VUE DE LEUR ILLUSTRATION, 
PAR Edouard Fleury. Two Volumes. 4°. Paris, 
1863. 

This is a most interesting work, presenting an analysis of the 
various styles of ornamentation found in the manuscripts, and 
illustrated by carefully executed plates. 

58 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

A DICTIONARY OF MINIATURISTS, ILLUMI- 
NATORS, CALLIGRAPHERS, AND COPYISTS, 
From the Establishment of Christianity to the 
Eighteenth Century, by John W. Bradley, B. A. 
Three Volumes. 8°. London, 1887-1889. 

THE ILLUMINATED BOOKS OF THE MIDDLE 
AGES: An Account of the Development and Pro- 
gress OF the Art of Illumination, as a Distinct Branch 
OF Pictorial Ornamentation, from the IV to the 
XVII Century. By Henry Noel Humphreys. Illus- 
trated BY a Series of Examples, of the size of the 
Originals, selected from the most beautiful Manu- 
scripts OF the various periods, executed on Stone 
and printed in Colors by Owen Jones. Folio and 
4°. London, 1844- 1849. 

Although this splendid volume cannot be regarded as equal 
in magnificence to the work of the Comte De Bastard, it is a 
most meritorious and successful effort to produce a similar pub- 
lication in England executed by the same process and at a mod- 
erate expense. It contains thirty-nine very fine examples of 
illuminated manuscripts of various ages and countries, excellently 
drawn, colored, and gilded, derived from both British and 
foreign libraries, arranged in a systematic order, with copious de- 
scriptions, and an introductory sketch of the rise and progress 
of the art of illumination. The work was originally published 
in thirteen parts, in quarto at I2s. each, and in folio at ;^i is. 

59 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

ASTLE (THOS.). ORIGIN AND PROGRESS OF 
WRITING. Second Edition. 4°. London, 1803. 

The first edition, published in 1784, in 4°, is of little value 
compared with that of 1803. 



THE ART OF ILLUMINATING AND MISSAL 
PAINTING: A Guide to Modern Illuminators. Il- 
lustrated BY A Series of Specimens from richly illu- 
minated Manuscripts of various periods, accompanied 
BY A set of Outlines, to be colored by the Student 
according to the theories developed in the work. 
By Henry Noel Humphreys. Square 8°. London, 
1849. 



UNIVERSAL PALEOGRAPHY; or, Fac-similes of 
Writings of all Nations and Periods, copied from the 
most celebrated and authentic manuscripts in the 
Libraries and Archives of France, Italy, Germany, 
AND England, by M. J. B. Silvestre: accompanied by 

AN historical AND DESCRIPTIVE TeXT AND INTRODUCTION 

BY Champollion-Figeac and Aime Champollion, Fils. 
Translated from the French, and edited, with Cor- 
rections AND Notes, by Sir Frederic Madden, K. H., 
F. R. S., Keeper of the Department of Manuscripts in 
THE British Museum. Two Volumes. 8°. London, 1850. 

60 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

THE LIFE AND WORKS OF GIORGIO GIULIO 
CLOVIO, Miniaturist, with Notices of his Con- 
temporaries AND THE Art of Book Decoration in 
THE Sixteenth Century, by John W. Bradley, B. A. 
8°. London, 1891. 



PALAEOGRAPHIA SACRA PICTORIA : Being a 
Series of Illustrations of the Ancient Versions of 
the Bible, copied from Illuminated Manuscripts 

executed between the IV AND THE XVI CeNTURIES. 

By J. O. Westwood, F. L. S. 4°. London, i 843-1 845. 



PEINTURES ET ORNEMENTS DES MANU- 
SCRITS, classes dans un Ordre Chronologique, pour 
servir a l'Histoire DES Arts du Dessin, depuis le 
yifeME Si^(^LE DE l'Ere Chretienne jusqu'A la fin du 
XYji£me p^j^ lj. Comte a. De Bastard. Folio. 
LivRAisoNs I-X. Paris, 1835- 1843. 

It is stated by M. Aime ChampoUion Figeac that each livraison 
of this splendid production is charged 1,800 francs, and that the 
whole expense of every copy will exceed 100,000 francs. If the 
design should ever be completed, the work is intended to consist 
of a series of geographical sections, exhibiting the character- 
istics of the illuminations of various countries ; but only that 
relating to France is now in the course of publication. 

61 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

ILLUMINATED ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BI- 
BLE, COPIED FROM SELECT MANUSCRIPTS OF THE MiDDLE 

Ages. By J. O. Westwood. Small 4°. London, 
1844, 1845. 

Though the principal object of the first of these works was to 
represent the writing of the manuscripts referred to, yet the num- 
ber of illuminated ornaments and paintings connected with those 
fac-similes is very considerable, and comprises many very inter- 
esting examples. The descriptive text also is copious, and full 
of valuable information. 



LIBRAIRIE DE JEAN DE FRANCE, Due De Berry, 
Frere du Roi Charles V, publiee en son entier pour 
LA premiere fois, precedee de la Vie de ce Prince : 
illustree de plus belles Miniatures de ses Manu- 
scrits, accompagnee de notes bibliographiques, et 

SUIVIE DE ReCHERCHES POUR SERVIR A l'HiSTOIRE DES 

Arts du Dessin au Moyen Age. Par le Comte Au- 
GUSTE De Bastard. Folio. Paris, 1834. 

Only thirty-two plates of this very fine publication were 
issued, with the memoir of the Due De Berry, when the design 
was given up and the ensuing splendid collection commenced, 
in which were reproduced some of the illustrations intended for 
this interesting catalogue. In both of these works the illustra- 
tions are printed in colors and gold by the process of chromo- 
lithography. 

62 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

A TREATISE ON PAINTING. Written by Cennino 
Cennini in the Year 1437, and First Published in 
Italian in 1821; Translated by Mrs. Merrifield. 
8°. London, 1844. 



ILLUMINATED ORNAMENTS SELECTED 
FROM MANUSCRIPTS AND EARLY PRINTED 
BOOKS, FROM THE SIXTH TO THE SEVEN- 
TEENTH CENTURY. Drawn and Engraved by 
Henry Shaw, F. S. A., with Descriptions by Sir Fred- 
eric Madden, K. H., F. R. S., Assistant Keeper of the 
Manuscripts in the British Museum. 4°. London, 
1833. 

This work was originally published in twelve parts, some 
copies of which were printed on imperial quarto paper and 
heightened with gold. It contains forty plates. 



PALfiOGRAPHIE UNIVERSELLE. Collection de 
Fac-similes d'Ecritures de tous les peuples et de tous 
les temps ; tires des plus authentiques Documents de 
l'Art Graphique, Chartes, et Manuscrits, existant 
dans les Archives et les Bibliotheques de France, 
d'Italie, d'Allemagne, et d'Angleterre, publies 
D*APRi:s DES modeles f crits, dessines, et peints sur les 

13 63 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

LIEUX, PAR M. J. B. SiLVESTRE ; ET ACCOMPAGN^S d'ExPLI- 
CATIONS HiSTORIQUES ET DeSCRIPTIVES PAR MM. ChAM- 
POLLION-FlGEAC ET AlME ChAMPOLLION, FiLS. FoUR 

Volumes. Folio. Paris, i839--i842. 

As the design of this extremely beautiful publication was to il- 
lustrate the history and practice of the art of writing in all ages 
and nations, the introduction of illuminations and miniatures is 
only incidental, as such decorations might occur in the specimens 
selected ; but in the whole series those examples are both numer- 
ous and interesting, as well as faithfully and beautifully executed. 



OEUVRE DE JEHAN FOUCQUET. Two Volumes. 
8°. Paris: L. Curmer, 1866. 

The first volume contains fac-simile copies in chromo-lithog- 
raphy of miniatures and borders executed by Foucquet. 

The second volume contains an account of the artist and 
his works. 



64 



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